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Library blog

These blogs are written by the librarians of the Peace Palace Library. All blogs are dealing with subjects on International Law. Every blog contains links and references to the collection of the Peace Palace Library.

  • UPEACE/Peace Palace Library Lecture: Judge Kenneth Keith and PCA Legal Counsel Judith Levine on International Water Disputes

    January 30, 2015

    On Wednesday January 28, 2015, the fourth of a series of Lectures on Peacebuilding in Progress was held at the Academy Building of the Peace Palace, The Hague. The lectures on Peacebuilding are organised by the UPEACE Centre The Hague and the Peace Palace Library.

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  • Palestine in the International Criminal Court: impact and consequences!

    January 23, 2015

    The year 2014 ended with a cliff-hanger for the Israeli-Palestinian question. Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas signed the Rome Statute on New Year’s eve, a day after a UN resolution mandating Israeli withdrawal from the West Bank failed to pass at the Security Council. As a result, on 6 January 2015, the UN secretary-general confirmed by an official note that Palestine will accede to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court on April 1, 2015. In this blog I will explain the meaning of the Palestinian accession, the procedure of preliminary examination by the International Criminal Court and possible consequences for the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.

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  • Borders Beyond Control?

    January 16, 2015

    In my previous blogpost “Feigning Immigration Control”, I argued that politicians are often busy with feigning immigration control while in reality they often can or want to do little about it. What do we actually know about the effects of immigration policies? In order to answer this question, I have conducted a research project on the ‘Determinants of International Migration’ (DEMIG) at the International Migration Institute at Oxford University. One of the main insights of the project is that while immigration restrictions often reduce immigration, these effects tend to be rather small. In addition, restrictions often have a four potential side-effects (‘substitution effects’) which further undermine their effectiveness or can even make them counter-productive.

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  • Happy Retirement Ingrid!

    January 9, 2015

    [On the retirement of our curator Ingrid Kost; blog in Dutch] Vandaag 15 januari 2015 is een memorabele dag voor de bibliotheek van het Vredespaleis. Wij nemen na 39 jaar afscheid van onze collega Ingrid Kost. Zij zal genieten van een welverdiend pensioen. Tijd om andere dingen te gaan doen, zoals oppassen op de kleinkinderen en bijenhouden. Wij zullen haar deerlijk missen als collega en als mens. Alvorens vandaag afscheid te nemen, spraken wij met haar en haalden herinneringen op.

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  • Arms Trade Treaty: A Historic Breakthrough?

    December 31, 2014

    In Syria, a civil war is being fuelled by the transfer of conventional weapons from outside the country despite violations of humanitarian law and human rights abuses on both sides. The arms flows into conflicts, like Syria’s, have recently convinced states to adopt the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (hereinafter also ‘ATT’). A new international norm regulating the international trade in conventional arms that went into effect on Christmas Eve.

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  • The Eurasian Economic Union as a Geopolitical and Economic Counterweight to the European Union: the Case of Armenia

    December 19, 2014

    The Eurasian Economic Union is the next step in Eurasian economic integration. It will function as a common market with a customs union and has the aim of providing the free movement of goods, services, capital and workforce and conducting common policies in key economic sectors, such as energy and agriculture. The EEU was established in 2014 between Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Russia. A the treaty to enlarge the EEU by including Armenia was signed in October. In this blog we’ll discuss the main reasons for Armenia to join the EEU instead of choosing the path of closer cooperation with the European Union.

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  • The Present as History

    December 12, 2014

    Obviously, all history is shaped by the historians who create it. When we write the past, we are also writing the present. We are the history we create. What appears on the published page is imbued with our questions, our insight, our voice, our reason and our perceptions. David Armitage and Jo Guldi remind us of the importance and power of this reality in their recent publication ‘The History Manifesto’, 2014. It is also the reason why historiography is the study of historians’ interpretations of the past situated within the context of the time they wrote about that past. If historians of the future write the history of my world here on the eve of 2015, what would they see?

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  • ‘The Cyber Warfare Manual: A Detailed Assessment’

    December 4, 2014

    In the last 10 years cyber attacks on states, non-state actors and civilians have shown to be a powerful weapon to create serious havoc and disruption. Cyberwarfare could be considered as a serious threat to peace and security, leaving states, non-state actors and individuals in a vulnerable position due to a lacking legal framework to regulate this type of warfare. In order to tackle the problem of the missing framework applicable to cyberwarfare, in 2009 the CCDCOE, a NATO-accredited research and training facility in the field of cyber security, asked legal experts, practitioners and technical specialists to create a non-binding manual that would apply existing international law norms to cyberwarfare: the Cyberwarfare Manual.

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  • Lecture: There is Only War – Neutrals Reflect on the First World War, Tuesday, 2 December, 17:15 h.

    November 27, 2014

    It should not surprise us that war is never only about the actors waging it. Most non-belligerents in the First World War came into the war with clear expectations of what their neutrality meant and what their country’s international obligations were. Those expectations had been shaped by a century of precedent within an environment that enhanced and protected the rights of neutrals. This Peace Palace Library lecture by Maartje Abbenhuis starts at 17:15. Doors open at 17 h. Entrance fee € 4. Visit of the exhibition this day possible until 17 h.

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  • World War One Poetry and Music, Tuesday 25 November, Peace Palace

    November 19, 2014

    On Tuesday 25 November 2014, 19:45 hrs, a special ‘war poetry’ evening will take place in the Peace Palace to commemorate the First World War, based on a selection by Onno Kosters. Poems of well-known poets from Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy, such as Siegfried Sassoon and John McCrae, Georg Trakl, Guillaume Apollinaire will be recited. The reading of the poems will be interlarded with music compositions and performances by Rénan Zelada closely linked to the First World War. A guided tour of the exhibition ‘Peace Illusion Disturbed’ is included.

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