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Library blog

These blogs are written by the librarians of the Peace Palace Library. All blogs are dealing with subjects on International Law. Every blog contains links and references to the collection of the Peace Palace Library.

  • Paris Global Climate Agreement: Toward Entry into Force

    September 15, 2016

    On 21 September 2016, a special event will take place. United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has invited leaders from all countries to the UN Headquarters in New York from 8:00-9:00am to attend this event and to deposit their instruments of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession to the Paris Climate Agreement on climate change. The event will provide an opportunity to countries to publicly commit to joining or ratifying the agreement before the end of 2016. It is expected that the September event will help efforts to secure early entry into force of the Paris Agreement.

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  • Vacancy: Secretary-General of the United Nations

    September 8, 2016

    Coming autumn the United Nations will choose a successor of mr. Ban Ki-Moon, who served the organization as Secretary-General since January 1st , 2007. In the past few months no less than twelve people (six women and six men) applied for the job, including former Prime Ministers, Secretary of States and executives of several international organizations. At this moment (Sept 8th 2016) already two candidates withdrew from the procedure. This blog will analyze this particular procedure and its legal basis. It is not meant as an endorsement for any of the candidates.

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  • The Case for Border Controls

    September 1, 2016

    It is a legitimate right of sovereign states to control their borders. To achieve this, modern states have designed sophisticated immigration rules that use elaborate criteria such as nationality, age, diplomas, marital status and wealth to grant or refuse people the right to enter and settle. Both the ‘open’ and ‘closed’ border positions are unrealistic and do not justice to the complex realities of migration policy making, which is primarily about the selection of migrants, and not about numbers, despite muscle-flexing political rhetoric suggesting the contrary.

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  • A 100-year (Hi)Story of Statelessness

    August 25, 2016

    This blog looks at the 100-year (hi)story of the international community’s response to the phenomenon of statelessness. It explores four key chapters: the early international agreements which set the first limits on states’ freedom to regulate nationality; the post-WWII response by the United Nations to the scourge of statelessness; the emergence of the right to a nationality as a fundamental – and justiciable – human right; and finally the launch of a bold and ambitious campaign to eradicate statelessness once and for all.

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  • IALL 35th Annual Course “Common Law Perspectives in an International Context”

    August 19, 2016

    From the 31st July until the 3rd August 2016, the 35th Annual Course of the International Association of Law Libraries (IALL) on International Legal Information and Law. The theme of the Annual Course was “Common Law Perspectives in an International Context.” The IALL is a worldwide, cooperative non-profit organization of librarians, libraries, and other persons and institutions which are concerned with the acquisition, dissemination and use of legal information from sources other than their own jurisdictions. The IALL 35th Annual Course took place in Keble College, Oxford. Keble was founded in 1870. It is now one of the largest Oxford colleges.

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  • After Brexit a Citizens’ Declaration

    August 12, 2016

    Although EU citizenship has become one of the most distinctive symbols of the European Union since its foundation in 1992, the majority of UK voters have decided to leave the EU and to relinquish their rights as citizens of the Union. As discontent in other member states is growing too, the European Council should shed new light on the relation between the EU and its citizens through the adoption of a Citizens’ Declaration at its earliest opportunity. Guest blog by Jaap Hoeksma, author of the EU-monograph: From Common Market to Common Democracy.

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  • Cultural Property in Conflict

    August 4, 2016

    The destruction of cultural property is an old problem but still a topical issue. The destruction of cultural property in mostly Iraq and Syria is still a trending topic in the media. But it is not a new problem, cultural property has played a part in conflict and war throughout history. After the Second World War the Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict 1954 was created to prevent this destruction in the future, but even then it continued. Irina Bokova, director general of UNESCO, called this destruction of cultural property in Iraq ‘cultural cleansing’. “They want to tell us that there is no memory, that there is no culture, that there is no heritage”.

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  • Sports and Russian Doping: Fairness vs. the Human Right to Sport

    July 29, 2016

    Devastating Wada reports documented systematic, state-sponsored doping in Russian athletics. It found widespread state action to hide cheating among Russian athletes in the run up to the London 2012 Olympics, as well as a comprehensive cover up of doping during the World Championships in Moscow and the Winter Olympics in Sochi a year later. The IOC decided not to impose a blanket ban on the Russian team competing in the Rio Olympic Games. What’s fair play? Which human rights are in play? What is the credibility of the Olympic Games?

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  • The South China Sea Arbitration (12 July 2016) PCA Case No. 2013-19

    July 12, 2016

    In the South China Sea Arbitration Award (12 July 2016), an arbitral tribunal at The Hague found that China’s claim to historic rights to resources was incompatible with the detailed allocation of rights and maritime zones in the Convention. The Tribunal considered that prior to the Convention, the waters of the South China Sea beyond the territorial sea were legally part of the high seas, in which vessels from any State could freely navigate and fish. Accordingly, the Tribunal concluded that, as between the Philippines and China, there was no legal basis for China to claim historic rights to resources, in excess of the rights provided for by the Convention, within the sea areas falling within the ‘nine-dash line’.

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  • Photo Album Conférence de la Paix, La Haye 1899

    July 10, 2016

    In the collection of the Peace Palace Library two albums are treasured with historical photos of the First Hague Peace Conference of 1899. These two albums were a gift to Jonkheer J.C.N. van Eys, Secretary- General of the Conference and to the Dutch Minister and honorary chairman Mr. W.H. de Beaufort. The persons who had […]

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