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Library blog

These blogs are written by the librarians of the Peace Palace Library. All blogs are dealing with subjects on International Law. Every blog contains links and references to the collection of the Peace Palace Library.

  • Investment Protection: ISDS or ICS?

    May 26, 2016

    In the 1990s, European member states have concluded about 200 bilateral investment treaties (BITs) with Eastern European countries. For example, the Netherlands has BITs with Poland, the Baltic States, Slovakia and Czech Republic. Now most of these Eastern European countries are member states of the European Union themselves, the European Commission wants to put an end to the intra-EU bilateral investment treaties (BITs): agreements concluded between EU member states. If these agreements are terminated, there is a risk that European investors will not be strongly and adequately protected under the provisions currently included in the single market.

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  • Peace & Security Salon on Biological and Chemical Weapons

    May 19, 2016

    What if a non-state actor like Daesh gets hold of a biological or chemical weapon? Why was the Nobel Peace Prize awarded to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in 2013? These and many more topics concerning current threats and future developments of biological and chemical weapons were discussed at the third Peace Palace Library Peace & Security Salon on May 11th.

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  • 30 Years After Chernobyl – Nuclear Safety and Security

    May 12, 2016

    The Chernobyl nuclear tragedy had a tremendous impact on the global community. This nuclear disaster has changed the attitude of nations to nuclear safety. After the nuclear accident, new standards and strategies for improving nuclear and radiation safety, emergency response and disaster mitigation have been developed. Since the Chernobyl accident the International Atomic Energy Association has adopted many security related legal instruments have been adopted to increase nuclear safety and security on a global and domestic level.

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  • European Patent Office: An International Organization before a National Court

    May 7, 2016

    In recent years, the European Patent Office (EPO) has been plagued by ongoing problems between the leadership of this organization and its labour union (SUEPO) over workers’ rights. For a long time, problems remained unresolved, but as tensions rose and relations between the management and staff members became more strained, the labour union decided to request a national court in The Netherlands to take up the case against the European Patent Office. The city of The Hague , where one of the offices of the European Patent Office is established, takes justice very seriously and has so far, delivered two judgments, one by a High Court as well as by an Appeals Court.

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  • Preventing Bioterrorism, Risk and Legal Instruments

    April 28, 2016

    According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention a bioterrorism attack is the deliberate release of viruses, bacteria, toxins or other harmful agents used to cause illness or death in people, animals, or plants. In both the popular imagination and among lawmakers and national security experts, there exists the belief that with sufficient motivation and material resources, terrorist groups can produce bioweapons easily, cheaply, and successfully. Some scholars disagree. Legal measures offer no guarantee for preventing bioterrorism, but nonetheless affect bioterrorism. What are the legal instruments addressing prevention?

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  • International Court of Justice 70th Anniversary!

    April 21, 2016

    On 20th April 2016, the International Court of Justice celebrated its seventieth anniversary with a solemn commemorative sitting at the Peace Palace, The Hague. King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands attended the official ceremony. Speeches were given by Judge Ronny Abraham, the President of the ICJ, Mr Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations, Mr Bert Koenders, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Mr. Antonio Gumende, Vice-President of the United Nations General Assembly.

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  • Royal Sperm Whales and More

    April 14, 2016

    Has any mammal inspired such romantic images of the sea and love for nature as much as the whale, yet aroused such controversy in global environmental conservation? Legal efforts to protect whales, however, extend beyond whaling issues. Even beyond protection itself. What about legal arrangements dealing with such large marine mammals found stranded on the shoreline? This so-called phenomenon of Cetacean stranding certainly is something that arouses public interest and emotion.

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  • Coral Reefs under Threat?

    April 7, 2016

    Are coral reefs condemned to disappear? During the first decade of the 21st century, the intensification of cyclones, the phenomenon of coral bleaching due to ocean warming, outbreaks of a coral-eating starfish and coral diseases left us with this fear. In terms of addressing knowledge gaps, coral reefs are a priority because of their extraordinarily high biological richness and the multitude of products and ecosystem services they provide to human beings. What is the status and legal regime of coral reefs nowadays?

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  • Dutch Referendum on the EU’s Association Agreement with Ukraine

    March 31, 2016

    Today, Wednesday April 6th, citizens in the Netherlands can cast their votes in an unprecedented advisory referendum. The question put to a vote is whether the Dutch government should ratify the European Union’s Association Agreement with Ukraine or not. This blog provides some background of the EU’s Association Agreement with Ukraine and the lead up to today’s referendum.

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  • Investigating Foreign Political Links in Timber-Producing Countries

    March 24, 2016

    At the time of writing, it is the International Day of Forests. It is on this day, 21st March 2016, that Project LEAF (Law Enforcement Assistance for Forests) of INTERPOL spoke out (again) about the link between corruption and the global trade in timber. An estimated $30 billion of government revenue is lost every year as a result of corruption in timber trade. This article will shed light on the indiscriminate destruction of our forests, under the guise of economic development for the financial benefit of elites at the highest level of the political system and how international, regional and national laws on anti-­corruption are implicated.

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