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Library blog

These blogs are written by the librarians of the Peace Palace Library. All blogs are dealing with subjects on International Law. Every blog contains links and references to the collection of the Peace Palace Library.

  • A 100-year (Hi)Story of Statelessness

    August 25, 2016

    This blog looks at the 100-year (hi)story of the international community’s response to the phenomenon of statelessness. It explores four key chapters: the early international agreements which set the first limits on states’ freedom to regulate nationality; the post-WWII response by the United Nations to the scourge of statelessness; the emergence of the right to a nationality as a fundamental – and justiciable – human right; and finally the launch of a bold and ambitious campaign to eradicate statelessness once and for all.

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  • IALL 35th Annual Course “Common Law Perspectives in an International Context”

    August 19, 2016

    From the 31st July until the 3rd August 2016, the 35th Annual Course of the International Association of Law Libraries (IALL) on International Legal Information and Law. The theme of the Annual Course was “Common Law Perspectives in an International Context.” The IALL is a worldwide, cooperative non-profit organization of librarians, libraries, and other persons and institutions which are concerned with the acquisition, dissemination and use of legal information from sources other than their own jurisdictions. The IALL 35th Annual Course took place in Keble College, Oxford. Keble was founded in 1870. It is now one of the largest Oxford colleges.

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  • After Brexit a Citizens’ Declaration

    August 12, 2016

    Although EU citizenship has become one of the most distinctive symbols of the European Union since its foundation in 1992, the majority of UK voters have decided to leave the EU and to relinquish their rights as citizens of the Union. As discontent in other member states is growing too, the European Council should shed new light on the relation between the EU and its citizens through the adoption of a Citizens’ Declaration at its earliest opportunity. Guest blog by Jaap Hoeksma, author of the EU-monograph: From Common Market to Common Democracy.

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  • Cultural Property in Conflict

    August 4, 2016

    The destruction of cultural property is an old problem but still a topical issue. The destruction of cultural property in mostly Iraq and Syria is still a trending topic in the media. But it is not a new problem, cultural property has played a part in conflict and war throughout history. After the Second World War the Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict 1954 was created to prevent this destruction in the future, but even then it continued. Irina Bokova, director general of UNESCO, called this destruction of cultural property in Iraq ‘cultural cleansing’. “They want to tell us that there is no memory, that there is no culture, that there is no heritage”.

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  • Sports and Russian Doping: Fairness vs. the Human Right to Sport

    July 29, 2016

    Devastating Wada reports documented systematic, state-sponsored doping in Russian athletics. It found widespread state action to hide cheating among Russian athletes in the run up to the London 2012 Olympics, as well as a comprehensive cover up of doping during the World Championships in Moscow and the Winter Olympics in Sochi a year later. The IOC decided not to impose a blanket ban on the Russian team competing in the Rio Olympic Games. What’s fair play? Which human rights are in play? What is the credibility of the Olympic Games?

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  • The South China Sea Arbitration (12 July 2016) PCA Case No. 2013-19

    July 12, 2016

    In the South China Sea Arbitration Award (12 July 2016), an arbitral tribunal at The Hague found that China’s claim to historic rights to resources was incompatible with the detailed allocation of rights and maritime zones in the Convention. The Tribunal considered that prior to the Convention, the waters of the South China Sea beyond the territorial sea were legally part of the high seas, in which vessels from any State could freely navigate and fish. Accordingly, the Tribunal concluded that, as between the Philippines and China, there was no legal basis for China to claim historic rights to resources, in excess of the rights provided for by the Convention, within the sea areas falling within the ‘nine-dash line’.

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  • Photo Album Conférence de la Paix, La Haye 1899

    July 10, 2016

    In the collection of the Peace Palace Library two albums are treasured with historical photos of the First Hague Peace Conference of 1899. These two albums were a gift to Jonkheer J.C.N. van Eys, Secretary- General of the Conference and to the Dutch Minister and honorary chairman Mr. W.H. de Beaufort. The persons who had […]

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  • The Hague Academy 2016

    July 7, 2016

    The Hague Academy of International Law is an institution that is well known for its summer courses. These courses have been given since 1923 to several thousands of young international lawyers. As years have gone by, attendance has become almost a rite of passage for any student of public or private international law, who can hardly feel fully-fledged without having spent some time at this temple of international law. The Academy’s renown is due to the quality of its teachers, for whom an invitation to give a course is a mark of recognition of their eminence and fame.

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  • Wake up call for Europe

    June 30, 2016

    Last Thursday, June 23, the British people voted to leave the European Union in an unprecedented referendum about membership of the European Union. According to the official result 51.9% of the registered voters choose to leave against 48.1% who wanted the United Kingdom to remain a member of the European Union. This blog will assess certain aspects of the outcome of the referendum and will try to clarify what the next steps of the so-called Brexit are.

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  • Ending Violence against Women

    June 23, 2016

    Violence against women occurs throughout the world. Despite great strides made by the international women’s rights movement over many years, women and girls around the world are still married as children or trafficked into forced labor and sex slavery. They are refused access to education and political participation, and some are trapped in conflicts where rape is perpetrated as a weapon of war. Not to mention sexual violence against women and girls, massive rape and sexual assaults in India, Germany and Brazil. In this blog I will address the UNiTE campaign, goals and the most prominent global norms and standards concerning the ending of violence against women.

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