RSS

Library blog

These blogs are written by the librarians of the Peace Palace Library. All blogs are dealing with subjects on International Law. Every blog contains links and references to the collection of the Peace Palace Library.

  • The South China Sea Arbitration (12 July 2016) PCA Case No. 2013-19

    July 12, 2016

    In the South China Sea Arbitration Award (12 July 2016), an arbitral tribunal at The Hague found that China’s claim to historic rights to resources was incompatible with the detailed allocation of rights and maritime zones in the Convention. The Tribunal considered that prior to the Convention, the waters of the South China Sea beyond the territorial sea were legally part of the high seas, in which vessels from any State could freely navigate and fish. Accordingly, the Tribunal concluded that, as between the Philippines and China, there was no legal basis for China to claim historic rights to resources, in excess of the rights provided for by the Convention, within the sea areas falling within the ‘nine-dash line’.

    Read more
  • The Hague Academy 2016

    July 7, 2016

    The Hague Academy of International Law is an institution that is well known for its summer courses. These courses have been given since 1923 to several thousands of young international lawyers. As years have gone by, attendance has become almost a rite of passage for any student of public or private international law, who can hardly feel fully-fledged without having spent some time at this temple of international law. The Academy’s renown is due to the quality of its teachers, for whom an invitation to give a course is a mark of recognition of their eminence and fame.

    Read more
  • Wake up call for Europe

    June 30, 2016

    Last Thursday, June 23, the British people voted to leave the European Union in an unprecedented referendum about membership of the European Union. According to the official result 51.9% of the registered voters choose to leave against 48.1% who wanted the United Kingdom to remain a member of the European Union. This blog will assess certain aspects of the outcome of the referendum and will try to clarify what the next steps of the so-called Brexit are.

    Read more
  • Ending Violence against Women

    June 23, 2016

    Violence against women occurs throughout the world. Despite great strides made by the international women’s rights movement over many years, women and girls around the world are still married as children or trafficked into forced labor and sex slavery. They are refused access to education and political participation, and some are trapped in conflicts where rape is perpetrated as a weapon of war. Not to mention sexual violence against women and girls, massive rape and sexual assaults in India, Germany and Brazil. In this blog I will address the UNiTE campaign, goals and the most prominent global norms and standards concerning the ending of violence against women.

    Read more
  • Brexit: Countdown to a Possible Withdrawal Procedure

    June 16, 2016

    On June 23, the United Kingdom will vote “in” or “out” on its membership in the European Union. What is the procedure of withdrawal and the Treaty Article which governs it all if the U.K. does indeed vote for a “Brexit” from the EU? Article 50 of the Treaty on the functioning of the European Union outlines the procedural steps for a Member State wishing to withdraw from the EU. This provision was introduced by the Treaty of Lisbon (in force 1 December 2009). The treaty foresees two options in which withdrawal can occur. The first option is the conclusion of a withdrawal agreement. The second option is that no agreement is reached.

    Read more
  • Vessel-Source Air Pollution Remains Global ‘Blindspot’

    June 2, 2016

    Shipping is considered to be a significant source of global air pollution, both for conventional pollutants and greenhouse gases. Sulphur and black carbon, also called soot, are released in the air in large quantities because large (container and cruise) ships use heavy bunker oil. This is oil from the waste well of the oil industry, the cheapest and dirtiest thing you can get. Seventeen containerships emit as much sulfur as all the cars on the planet in one year. And one cruise ship emits a day as much soot as one million cars.

    Read more
  • Investment Protection: ISDS or ICS?

    May 26, 2016

    In the 1990s, European member states have concluded about 200 bilateral investment treaties (BITs) with Eastern European countries. For example, the Netherlands has BITs with Poland, the Baltic States, Slovakia and Czech Republic. Now most of these Eastern European countries are member states of the European Union themselves, the European Commission wants to put an end to the intra-EU bilateral investment treaties (BITs): agreements concluded between EU member states. If these agreements are terminated, there is a risk that European investors will not be strongly and adequately protected under the provisions currently included in the single market.

    Read more
  • Peace & Security Salon on Biological and Chemical Weapons

    May 19, 2016

    What if a non-state actor like Daesh gets hold of a biological or chemical weapon? Why was the Nobel Peace Prize awarded to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in 2013? These and many more topics concerning current threats and future developments of biological and chemical weapons were discussed at the third Peace Palace Library Peace & Security Salon on May 11th.

    Read more
  • 30 Years After Chernobyl – Nuclear Safety and Security

    May 12, 2016

    The Chernobyl nuclear tragedy had a tremendous impact on the global community. This nuclear disaster has changed the attitude of nations to nuclear safety. After the nuclear accident, new standards and strategies for improving nuclear and radiation safety, emergency response and disaster mitigation have been developed. Since the Chernobyl accident the International Atomic Energy Association has adopted many security related legal instruments have been adopted to increase nuclear safety and security on a global and domestic level.

    Read more
  • European Patent Office: An International Organization before a National Court

    May 7, 2016

    In recent years, the European Patent Office (EPO) has been plagued by ongoing problems between the leadership of this organization and its labour union (SUEPO) over workers’ rights. For a long time, problems remained unresolved, but as tensions rose and relations between the management and staff members became more strained, the labour union decided to request a national court in The Netherlands to take up the case against the European Patent Office. The city of The Hague , where one of the offices of the European Patent Office is established, takes justice very seriously and has so far, delivered two judgments, one by a High Court as well as by an Appeals Court.

    Read more