RSS

International law news

International law news is a Peace Palace Library news service on topics of International Law. The library is not responsible for the content of outside sources.

  • ICTR closes business after spending Sh3.4tr

    November 13, 2014

    The mandate of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) ends in December, with the court having spent Sh3.4 trillion ($2 billion) to try about 50 genocide cases, or roughly $100 million annually.

    Read more
  • UK drops security claim blocking Pakistani’s lawsuit over ‘torture’

    November 12, 2014

    The UK government has abandoned its long-standing claim that relations with Washington would suffer if a Pakistani citizen who claims he was tortured by British and American troops was allowed to sue for damages in court.

    Read more
  • EU Ryanair ‘screen-scraping’ case could affect biz models

    November 12, 2014

    Some price comparison websites and other online businesses could be forced to alter their business models if the EU’s highest court takes steps to prevent unauthorised “screen-scraping” of data, an expert has said.

    The Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) is due to hear arguments today from Ryanair and a Dutch price comparison business about the extent to which rules contained in the EU’s Database Directive apply to data that is not protected by copyright or a “sui generis” database right

    Read more
  • Quiet heroism evaporates in ‘who killed Osama?’ row

    November 12, 2014

    It is three and a half years since US Navy Seals stormed into a compound in Abbottabad and killed Osama bin Laden. The death of the Al Qaeda leader in Pakistan has reappeared in the news of late with an unseemly row over precisely which Seal fired the fatal shot.

    Quite apart from the fact that the mission was obviously the result of months of work by large teams of intelligence operatives, the Seals’ noisy claims are troubling, for two reasons

    Read more
  • Court Opinion Says Ex-U.S. Soldier Could Claim EU Asylum

    November 12, 2014

    A U.S. citizen who enlisted and served in the Iraq war but later deserted because he believed the conflict was contrary to international law could have the right to claim asylum in the European Union, according to an opinion from the bloc’s top court.

    Read more
  • The 1915 Genocide : Who Can Legally Represent Armenians?

    November 12, 2014

    The Soviet Republic of Armenia, which covered only a small portion of the historical land or Armenia, was instituted on 20th November 1920. Almost five years had passed since the killings had started, and two years after the completion of the campaigns of destruction which ravaged the Ottoman Armenian community. Armenia reached its total independence on 21st September 1991.

    Given that the Armenian State did not yet exist when the crimes were perpetrated, the first question coming to mind is whether Armenia is entitled to bring the matter to Court, and legally qualifies for the right and legal interest to undertake an action for damages.

    Read more
  • Justice Deferred: Rule of Law in Central America

    November 12, 2014

    One of the primary causes of political violence in Central America during the second half of the 20th century was the absence of democratic rule of law. Elected or not, political leaders were rarely held accountable under the law. Laws were established and applied in an arbitrary fashion.

    Read more
  • Study Asserts That Controversial Gulf Labor Regime Reduces Global Inequality

    November 11, 2014

    With the absence of labor rights in the Gulf under fire as a result of Qatar’s successful bid to host the 2022 World Cup, Gulf states are likely to take heart from a recent study that asserts that authoritarian regimes in the oil-rich Middle East and China have contributed more to the eradication of global inequality than Western nations.

    Read more
  • The only way to protect citizens from their governments is to divide sovereign authority between the national and international levels

    November 11, 2014

    The foremost responsibility taken on by a state is ensuring the safety of its citizens, but how can citizens be protected if the threat to their safety comes from their own government? Carmen Pavel argues that it is a mistake to believe states alone can effectively protect the rights of individuals. She writes that only a form of ‘divided sovereignty’, in which international institutions are invested with the authority to constrain the actions of governments, can ensure individual rights are upheld.

    Read more
  • ‘Idea of the ICC hearing Gaddafi’s son case is a farce’

    November 11, 2014

    The ICC was created by the same people who organized the overthrow and the assassination of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, so the trial on his son Saif is a complete fraud, Lawrence Freeman, editor of the Executive Intelligence Review magazine, told RT.

    Read more