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International law news

International law news is a Peace Palace Library news service on topics of International Law. The library is not responsible for the content of outside sources.

  • ‘Lawful but Awful’

    January 13, 2015

    This past summer the Stimson Center, a nonpartisan think tank devoted to global security, issued the report of its task force on U.S. drone policy. It makes for depressing reading. Among other things, the report concludes that although the American use of drones for targeted killing may be legal, the pervasive use of drones threatens the rule of law.

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  • Dutch government sued over data retention law

    January 13, 2015

    The Dutch data retention law will have its day in court on Feb. 18, when the District Court of the Hague hears a legal challenge to it filed by a broad coalition of organizations.

    The law requires telecommunications and Internet companies to retain their customer’s location and traffic metadata for six to 12 months, depending on the type of data, for investigatory purposes.

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  • Indonesia targeting West Papuans with mass arrests and home burning – reports

    January 13, 2015

    Indonesian authorities have conducted mass arrests and burned down the homes of West Papuan villagers in response to the deaths of two police officers, a West Papuan independence leader in exile has claimed.

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  • Interpol places former President Yanukovych on ‘wanted’ list, former Prime Minister Azarov missing

    January 13, 2015

    Interpol finally issued an international red notice for Viktor Yanukovych today, almost a year after the former President fled Ukraine following a failed attempt to violently disperse Euromaidan protesters on Kyiv’s Independence Square. More than a hundred people were killed when security forces opened fire on demonstrators.

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  • Why the Al-Jazeera Trial in Egypt Is So Important

    January 13, 2015

    “It’s pretty terrifying for all of us who are correspondents, who covered Egypt and who have covered the Middle East, because we look at the Al-Jazeera three and we think that could have been any of us,” Lindsey Hilsum, Channel 4 News’s International Editor, told me at a protest outside the Egyptian Embassy in London on December 29, the coldest day of the year.

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  • The Fate of the ICC: When Law and Politics Mix

    January 13, 2015

    Where to, with the International Criminal Court this year? Much has been put into it, and even more written about it. But the body continues to receive submissions and requests in terms of indicting war crime suspects that seem to gather dust. When efforts have been successful, the usual charge of partiality towards Africa is suggested. The current chief prosecutor of the ICC, Fatou Bensouda, assumed her job in June 2012. Since then, she has introduced a certain stutter to the workings of the court. In some cases, these stutters have become more prolonged.

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  • UN says evidence on ethnic massacres in S. Sudan may be sufficient for prosecutions

    January 12, 2015

    Criminal proceedings under South Sudanese and international law could be brought against the perpetrators of ethnic massacres in Bentiu and Bor last April, the United Nations said.

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  • Tunisia: Four Years On, Injustice Prevails

    January 12, 2015

    Tunisian efforts to ensure accountability for unlawful killings committed during the uprising four years ago were blighted by legal and investigative problems and failed to deliver justice for the victims, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. Apart from the life sentence imposed on former President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, who remains abroad, a lengthy process before military courts resulted in lenient sentences or acquittals for those accused of causing the deaths of protesters.

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  • International Criminal Court is thriving, not foundering

    January 12, 2015

    The Washington Post editorial reprinted in the Post-Dispatch regarding the International Criminal Court (“On shaky ground,” Jan. 5) identified the wrong source of the current difficulties with international justice. The problem is not the ICC, which is thriving, as victims of atrocities the world over look to it for help. Rather, it is the states refusing to join cause with the court against genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity that are foundering in their commitment to peace and human rights.

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  • Seizing Assets in Crimea, From Shipyard to Film Studio

    January 12, 2015

    In the scramble for Crimea’s spoils, armed forces have raided myriad enterprises across the peninsula, expelling the owners and claiming the property for the Crimean government.

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