Migration

Introduction

Migration - Research Guide International Law

The past few decades the movement of people across borders has increased significantly. According to the International Organization for Migration (IOM), more and more people are on the move today than at any other point in human history. According to the UN Convention on the Rights of Migrants, a migrant worker can be described as a ‘person who is to be engaged, is engaged or has been engaged in a remunerated activity in a State of which he or she is not a national’. In article 1.1 of this Convention only those people who freely take the decision to migrate are considered migrants: the notion ‘migrant’ “should be understood as covering all cases where the decision to migrate is taken freely by the individual concerned, for reasons of ‘personal convenience’ and without intervention of an external compelling factor. Thus, the definition of migrant does not refer to individuals who have been forced or compelled to leave their home or country, such as refugees and internally displaced persons and refugees. Various aspects of migration include: labour migration, family reunification, migration and security, combating irregular migration, migration and trade, migrant rights, health and migration, integration, migration and development.

This Research Guide is intended as a starting point for research on Migration. It provides the basic materials available in the Peace Palace Library, both in print and electronic format. Handbooks, leading articles, bibliographies, periodicals, serial publications and documents of interest are presented in the Selective Bibliography section. Links to the PPL Catalogue are inserted. The Library’s classification index code 99. The State and the Aliens. General Works, 100. Emigration and Immigration. General Works, 101. Emigration and Immigration in the Various States and subject heading (keyword) Migration are instrumental for searching through the Catalogue. Special attention is given to our subscriptions on databases, e-journals, e-books and other electronic resources. Finally, this Research Guide features links to relevant websites and other online resources of particular interest.

Bibliography

Reference works

Leading articles

Documents

Periodicals, serial publications

Bibliographies

New titles


1. Les immigrés d'Afrique subsaharienne en Europe
Les immigrés d'Afrique subsaharienne en Europe : une nouvelle diaspora? / Jacques Barou In: Revue européenne des migrations internationales = ISSN 0765-0752: vol. 28, issue 1, page 147-167. - 2012
Keywords: Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, Ethnic minorities, Ethnic identity, Diaspora, Migration,

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  • Westin, C., and S. Hassanen, People on the Move: Experiences of Forced Migration. With Examples from Various Parts of the World, Trenton, The Red Sea Press, 2014.

    This volume deals with various issues of forced migration from developing countries, in some cases to neighbouring countries, in others to countries in the developed world. The forty-year period covered is from the late 1960s. In some cases the migration processes the contributors concentrate on resulted in settlement on a permanent basis in a receiving country, in their examples with strong links to diasporic communities elsewhere; in other cases the outcome is that individual families making up the diasporic cultural community go transnational themselves, living here at times, living there for periods, commuting and transcending national, cultural, political and linguistic boundaries. Chapters presenting empirical examples are guided theoretically, bringing observations in to theoretical interpretations. These chapters are interspersed with theoretical expositions of concepts such as durable solutions, nation state, citizenship and transnationalism.

    This volume deals with various issues of forced migration from developing countries, in some cases to neighbouring countries, in others to countries in the developed world. The forty-year period covered is from the late 1960s. In some cases the migration processes the contributors concentrate on resulted in settlement on a permanent basis in a receiving country, in their examples with strong links to diasporic communities elsewhere; in other cases the outcome is that individual families making up the diasporic cultural community go transnational themselves, living here at times, living there for periods, commuting and transcending national, cultural, political and linguistic boundaries. Chapters presenting empirical examples are guided theoretically, bringing observations in to theoretical interpretations. These chapters are interspersed with theoretical expositions of concepts such as durable solutions, nation state, citizenship and transnationalism.

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  • Chetail, V. and C. Bauloz (eds.), Research Handbook on International Law and Migration, Cheltenham, Edward, Elgar, 2014.

    Migration is a complex and multifaceted issue, and the current legal framework suffers from considerable ambiguity and lack of cohesive focus. This Handbook offers a comprehensive take on the intersection of law and migration studies and provides strategies for better understanding the potential of international legal norms in regulating migration. Authoritative analyses by the most renowned and knowledgeable experts in the field focus on important migration issues and challenge the current normative framework with new ways of thinking about the topic.

    Migration is a complex and multifaceted issue, and the current legal framework suffers from considerable ambiguity and lack of cohesive focus. This Handbook offers a comprehensive take on the intersection of law and migration studies and provides strategies for better understanding the potential of international legal norms in regulating migration. Authoritative analyses by the most renowned and knowledgeable experts in the field focus on important migration issues and challenge the current normative framework with new ways of thinking about the topic.

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  • Juss, S.S. (ed.), The Ashgate Research Companion to Migration Law, Theory and Policy, Farnham, Ashgate, 2013.

    Juss, S.S. (ed.), The Ashgate Research Companion to Migration Law, Theory and Policy, Farnham, Ashgate, 2013.
    The Ashgate Research Companion to Migration Law, Theory and Policy complements the already successful Ashgate series Law & Migration, established in 2006 which now has a number of well-regarded monographs to its credit. The purpose of this Companion is to augment that Series, by taking stock of the current state of literature on migration law, theory and policy, and to sketch out the contours of its future long-term development, in what is now a vastly expanded research agenda. The Companion provides readers with a definitive and dependable state-of-art review of current research in each of the chosen areas that is all-embracing and all-inclusive of its subject-matter. The chapters focus on the regional and the sub-regional, as well as the national and the global. In so doing, they aim to give a snap-shot that is contextual, coherent, and comprehensive. The contributors are both world-renowned scholars and newer voices and include scholars, practitioners, former judges and researchers and policy-makers who are currently working for international organisations.
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  • Opeskin, B. (et al.) (eds.), Foundations of International Migration Law, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2012.

    Opeskin, B. (et al.) (eds.), Foundations of International Migration Law, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2012.

    International migration law is an important field of international law, which has attracted exceptional interest in recent years. This book has been written from a wide variety of perspectives for those wanting to understand the legal framework that regulates migration. It is intended for students new to this field of study who seek an overview of its many components. It will also appeal to those who have focussed on a particular branch of international migration law but require an understanding of how their specialisation fits with other branches of the discipline. Written by migration law specialists and led by respected international experts, this volume draws upon the combined knowledge of international migration law and policy from academia; international, intergovernmental, regional and non-governmental organisations; and national governments. Additional features include case studies, maps, break-out boxes and references to resources which allow for a full understanding of the law in context.

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Database

Blogs

  • Borders Beyond Control?

    In my previous blogpost “Feigning Immigration Control”, I argued that politicians are often busy with feigning immigration control while in reality they often can or want to do little about it. What do we actually know about the effects of immigration policies? In order to answer this question, I have conducted a research project on the ‘Determinants of International Migration’ (DEMIG) at the International Migration Institute at Oxford University. One of the main insights of the project is that while immigration restrictions often reduce immigration, these effects tend to be rather small. In addition, restrictions often have a four potential side-effects (‘substitution effects’) which further undermine their effectiveness or can even make them counter-productive.

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  • Border Controls and Human Rights: Migration in the Central Mediterranean

    The Central Mediterranean has, in the last years, turned into the epicentre of human (migrant) disasters. The Central Mediterranean route refers to the migratory flow coming from Northern Africa towards Italy and Malta through the Mediterranean Sea. Here, Libya often acts as nexus point where migrants from the Horn of Africa and Western African routes meet before embarking on their journey towards the EU.

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  • First Global Forum on Statelessness - "New Directions in Statelessness Research and Policy"

    From 15 to 17 September 2014, 3 institutions (the UNHCR, the agency mandated by the General Assembly to help states to address statelessness, and the Statelessness Programme of Tilburg University) co-hosted the first held Global Forum on Statelessness. The three-day event took place in the Academy building of the Peace Palace of The Hague, the Netherlands.

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  • “People must be able to look one another in the eye”. Plans of the Dutch Government to ban face-covering clothing.

    The Dutch Government chose to ignore the advice of the Council of State concerning the ban on face-covering clothing. The Council of State, the advisory organ of the Government, heavily criticised the legislative proposal. First, the Council of State does not consider the complete ban as necessary and useful. Second, the Council of State is of the opinion that a ban on face covering clothing is an infringement of the freedom of religion.

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  • Cultural Diversity

    On Monday the 17th of August 2009 the Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations of the Hague Academy of International Law started. The Centre takes place annually at the Academy and Library building of the Peace Palace. The purpose of the Centre is to bring together advanced young scholars of [...]

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  • European Pact on Immigration and Asylum

    European Pact on Immigration and Asylum : At a meeting in Cannes on Monday, 7 July, EU ministers approved French proposals for a tougher common policy to stem the influx of illegal immigrants, despite some differences and concerns about accusations of xenophobia from outside the European Union.

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