Subjects of International Law

Introduction

Subjects of International Law - Research Guide International Law by Dr. Ruwanthika Gunaratne

Subjects of International Law can be described as those persons or entities who possess international personality. Throughout the 19th century, only States qualified as subjects of international law. After, the Second World War, more and more new actors emerged in the international legal arena such as the intergovernmental organizations created by States, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) created by individuals, multinationals and even natural persons (i.e. individuals). These can now be considered as having to a large or sometimes limited extend the capacity to become international persons.

This Research Guide is intended as a starting point for research on Subjects of International Law. It provides the basic legal materials available in the Peace Palace Library, both in print and electronic format. Handbooks, leading articles, bibliographies, periodicals, serial publications and documents of interest are presented in the Selective Bibliography section. Links to the PPL Catalogue are inserted. The Library’s subject heading (keyword) Subjects of International Law is instrumental for searching through the Catalogue. Special attention is given to our subscriptions on databases, e-journals, e-books and other electronic resources. Finally, this Research Guide features links to relevant websites and other online resources of particular interest.

New titles


1. The Palestinian Statehood Strategy in the United Nations: Lessons from Namibia
The Palestinian Statehood Strategy in the United Nations: Lessons from Namibia / Susan Akram. - Washington, DC : Tadween Publishing. - Page 97-107 In: Aborted State? : The UN Initiative and New Palestinian Junctures / editors: Noura Erakat, Mouin Rabbani ; contributors: Richard Falk [and twenty-four others], ISBN 9781939067043: (2013), Page 97-107. - 2013
Keywords: Palestine, Namibia, United Nations, Recognition of states, Member states, Comparative law,

2. Le concept de souveraineté a-t-il encore un avenir (1)?
Le concept de souveraineté a-t-il encore un avenir (1)? / Monique Chemillier-Gendreau In: Revue du droit public et de la science politique en france et a l'etranger = ISSN 0035-2578: (2014), issue 5 (sep-oct), page 1283-1309. - 2014
Keywords: Sovereignty, Legal concept, Philosophy of law,

Bibliography

Reference works

Books

Leading articles

Documents

Periodicals, serial publications

Bibliographies

New titles


1. The Palestinian Statehood Strategy in the United Nations: Lessons from Namibia
The Palestinian Statehood Strategy in the United Nations: Lessons from Namibia / Susan Akram. - Washington, DC : Tadween Publishing. - Page 97-107 In: Aborted State? : The UN Initiative and New Palestinian Junctures / editors: Noura Erakat, Mouin Rabbani ; contributors: Richard Falk [and twenty-four others], ISBN 9781939067043: (2013), Page 97-107. - 2013
Keywords: Palestine, Namibia, United Nations, Recognition of states, Member states, Comparative law,

2. Le concept de souveraineté a-t-il encore un avenir (1)?
Le concept de souveraineté a-t-il encore un avenir (1)? / Monique Chemillier-Gendreau In: Revue du droit public et de la science politique en france et a l'etranger = ISSN 0035-2578: (2014), issue 5 (sep-oct), page 1283-1309. - 2014
Keywords: Sovereignty, Legal concept, Philosophy of law,

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  • Summers, J., Peoples and International Law, Leiden, Brill Nijhoff, 2014.

    peoples and international law

    Peoples and International Law is a detailed survey of the law of self-determination with a focus on the concept of nations and peoples. It engages with different aspects of this law with particular emphasis on the drafting and implementation of international instruments. The second edition includes new coverage of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the African and Arab charters. It considers recent practice by the Human Rights Committee, Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights dealing with the emerging political, economic and environmental aspects of the right. The book looks at the interaction of international law, nationalism and liberalism in theories of nationhood and self-determination, as well as, the historical development of the right and the decisions of international bodies. Lastly, it examines practice in this area, including new developments in remedial independence and international territorial administration.

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  • Kettemann, M.C., The Future of Individuals in International Law: Lessons From International Internet Law, The Hague, Eleven International Publishing, 2013.

    subjects

    The state-centric international order is in flux and the role of the individual as an actor in international law is growing. Yet in most international law regimes, states continue to interposition themselves between individuals and international law. Against the background of humanization which is shown to permeate all international legal regimes, this book sketches the future of individuals in international law. From the normative success of International Internet Law as the most innovative post-interposition regime this book draws lessons for the optimal design of (existing and emerging) legal frameworks. Describing in detail the characteristics of a post-interposition regime, including a commitment to multistakeholderism, non-traditional normative instruments and system-wide disintermediation, this book demonstrates why the future of individuals in international law looks bright.

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  • Harel Ben-Ari, R., The Legal Status of International Non-Governmental Organizations: Analysis of Past and Present Initiatives (1912-2012), Leiden, Nijhoff, 2013.

    The Legal Status of International Non-Governmental Organizations

    The discourse regarding the legal status of international non-governmental organizations (INGOs) is not new; in fact, it has already progressed throughout the last 100 years. However, most of the proposals to grant official status to INGOs, or to otherwise regulate their cross-border activity, are relatively unknown to international lawyers. A perusal of these initiatives against their unique historical background will prove highly significant in dissecting the complexities involved in formulating a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of INGOs. Innovatively, this work outlines and evaluates the sequence of attempts to propose a formal status for INGOs. It demonstrates how this historical contextual analysis provides an invaluable perspective that is essential for the informed review of contemporary schemes and theoretical trends, relevant to the consideration of the status of INGOs. Unfortunately, most contemporary writers and activists who deal with the normative aspects of INGO activity neglect this crucial perspective.

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  • French, D., Statehood and Self-Determination: Reconciling Tradition and Modernity in International Law, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

    French, D., Statehood and Self-Determination: Reconciling Tradition and Modernity in International Law, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

    The concepts of statehood and self-determination provide the normative structure on which the international legal order is ultimately premised. As a system of law founded upon the issue of territorial control, ascertaining and determining which entities are entitled to the privileges of statehood continues to be one of the most difficult and complex issues. Moreover, although the process of decolonisation is almost complete, the principle of self-determination has raised new challenges for the metropolitan territories of established states, including the extent to which ‘internal’ self-determination guarantees additional rights for minority and other groups. As the controversies surrounding remedial secession have revealed, the territorial integrity of a state can be questioned if there are serious and persistent breaches of a people’s human rights. This volume brings together such debates to reflect further on the current state of international law regarding these fundamental issues.

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  • Schüssler, S., NGOs als Akteure der internationalen Sanktionspolitik zur Menschenrechtsförderung: Clubmitglieder oder Außenseiter?, Baden-Baden, Nomos, 2012.

    Schüssler, S., NGOs als Akteure der internationalen Sanktionspolitik zur Menschenrechtsförderung: Clubmitglieder oder Außenseiter?, Baden-Baden, Nomos, 2012.

    Welche Rolle spielen NGOs bei der Verhängung internationaler Sanktionen zur Durchsetzung von Menschenrechtsnormen? Auf Grundlage von zwei Fallstudien zur Sanktionspolitik gegen Südafrika in der Ära der Apartheid und dem heutigen Burma behandelt die Studie die Frage, wie sich die Einflussmöglichkeiten von NGOs auf internationale Sanktionsregime durch die Öffnung der Weltpolitik verändert haben. Auch wenn NGOs heute stärker auf die Inklusion bei der intergouvernementalen Regelsetzung drängen, haben sich ihre selbst definierten Aufgaben nicht verändert. NGOs übernehmen als Experten, Überwacher und private Sanktionierer wichtige Funktionen und sind somit keine Außenseiter der internationalen Sanktionspolitik.

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  • Szazi, E., NGOs: Legitimate Subjects of International Law, Leiden, Leiden University Press, 2012.

    Szazi, E., NGOs: Legitimate Subjects of International Law, Leiden, Leiden University Press, 2012.

    History shows that NGOs activity in the international arena has grown steadily since the beginning of the 20th century, accelerating its pace after the enactment of the UN Charter, which admitted pluralism not only between States, but also beyond States, because it acknowledged that individuals could interact with the United Nations not only through governmental organizations but also through non-governmental organizations. In ‘NGOs: legitimate subjects of International Law’, Eduardo Szazi presents a methodical appraisal of the role of NGOs in the contemporary world, addressing their main characteristics under each of the sources of international law, as well some pressing questions about the legitimacy deficit of States and Intergovernmental Organizations in the 21st century.

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Database

Blogs

  • Is Sudan set for a divorce?

    Sudan has a history of protracted conflict between the predominately Muslim north and the largely Christian south. On 9-15 January 2011, the citizens of Southern Sudan took part in a referendum to determine if they wish to become an independent state. Although South Sudan has been an autonomous region since the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) [...]

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  • The Influence of NGOs on International Law

    From a traditional point of view, International Public Law has been understood as a set of rules produced by states in order to regulate relations between them. Since the end of the Cold War, the role of NGOs in international law is growing in importance and their activities are reaching the remotest parts of the world. In this blog, I will briefly discuss how NGOs have transformed international law as well as how they continue to contribute to the development of international law.

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See also

More Research guides on Public International Law

PPL keywords

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