• International Peace and Security - Research Guide International Law

    International Peace and Security

    Research guide

    Many international or regional organizations are involved in peacemaking, peace-enforcing and peacekeeping activities. In fact, they send multinational forces to the various conflict areas. While the expression ‘collective security’ does not occur in the United Nations Charter, it is often used to refer to the system for the maintenance of international peace and security under the UN Charter.

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  • Intervention - Research Guide International Law

    Intervention

    Research guide

    The principle of non-intervention is an important principle in international law. It is closely connected to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of States. Violation of this principle by means of coercion, military action or support of an support for subversive or terrorist armed activities within another State is prohibited in international law for it impairs a State to freely make its sovereign choices.

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  • Refugees - Research Guide International Law

    Refugees

    Research guide

    The UN Convention relating to the Status of Refugees of 1951 defines a refugee as ‘owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality, and is unable […] to avail himself of the protection of that country’. Later this was expanded by the Convention’s 1967 Protocol to include persons who had fled war or other violence.

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  • Disarmament | Research Guide International Law

    Disarmament

    Research guide

    Disarmament is the act of reducing, limiting, or abolishing weapons. The main focus nowadays is on three categories of weapons: weapons of an indiscriminate effect, such as cluster munitions and landmines, biological and chemical weapons and the (non-) proliferation of nuclear weapons. General and complete disarmament was defined by the United Nations General Assembly as the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, coupled with the “balanced reduction of armed forces and conventional armaments, based on the principle of undiminished security of the parties with a view to promoting or enhancing stability at a lower military level, taking into account the need of all States to protect their security”.

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  • South Sudan: Birth Of A Nation

    Library blog - July 18, 2011

    On 9th July 2011, South-Sudan finally gained independence from Sudan after 50 years of conflicts in Northeasteren Africa. This blog will briefly discuss the most important obstacles that will lie ahead for the people of South-Sudan.

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  • Libya and the International Criminal Court (ICC)

    Library blog - March 14, 2011

    On February 16th 2011- following a wave of uprisings throughout the Middle-East- Libya experienced a so-called Day of Rage which led to protests breaking out to challenge Colonel Muammar Qadhafi’s 41 year old iron rule- the region’s longest. This blog will briefly discuss the actions taken by the United Nations Security Council and the ICC in response to the unfolding humanitarian crisis in Libya.

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  • Latin American Amnesty Laws Annulled; the Struggle Against Impunity Continues

    Library blog - January 17, 2011

    Over the last two decades national courts all throughout Latin-America began to vigorously ‘attack’ Amnesty laws in order for investigations on human rights violations from the past to go forward. This Blog will briefly outline the causes that led to to these recent changes in Latin – American legal culture.

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  • The Influence of NGOs on International Law

    Library blog - November 9, 2010

    From a traditional point of view, International Public Law has been understood as a set of rules produced by states in order to regulate relations between them. Since the end of the Cold War, the role of NGOs in international law is growing in importance and their activities are reaching the remotest parts of the world. In this blog, I will briefly discuss how NGOs have transformed international law as well as how they continue to contribute to the development of international law.

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  • Roma Rights in the European Union.

    Library blog - September 27, 2010

    In July 2010, The French government decided to begin to expel Roma’s, mainly from Romania and Bulgaria, as many of them were living in France illegally. This decision caused much controversy within the Institutions of the EU. This blog will briefly discuss in what way EU institutions have responded to recent Roma issues and what can be done to improve the position of this marginalized community in Europe.

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  • The First Review Conference of the ICC Statute & the Crime of Aggression Part II

    Library blog - July 12, 2010

    After two weeks of intense debates and years of preparatory work by the Special Working Group on the Crime of Aggression, the Review Conference of the Rome Statute adopted by consensus amendments to the Rome Statute which includes a definition of the Crime of Aggression and determined how the Court will exercise its jurisdiction over the crime.

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