RSS

  • Mali War Crimes Suspect Mr. Al Hassan Makes Initial Appearance Before the ICC

    Library blog - April 5, 2018

    After the Al Mahdi case, a landmark trial, a second case has been referred to the International Criminal Court (ICC) on charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in Timbuktu, Mali between 2012 and 2013. Another Malian national, 40-year-old Mr Al Hassan Ag Abdoul Aziz Ag Mohamed Ag Mahmoud, faces charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. He has been accused of destroying holy places, mausoleums of Muslim saints in Timbuktu and of enforcing a policy of forced marriage which had led to sexual slavery and rape of women and girls. The alleged crimes were committed between 2012 and 2013 when Timbuktu was under the control of militant islamists. From April 2012 until January 2013, Mr Al Hassan was head of the Islamic Police.

    Read more
  • Former Nazi Officer’s Plea for Mercy Rejected

    Library blog - January 18, 2018

    The mercy plea of Oskar Gröning, a 96-year-old former Nazi officer, has been denied. On July 15, 2015, Mr Gröning, who is also called the ‘bookkeeper of Auschwitz’, was condemned of being “guilty of aiding and abetting murder in three hundred thousand legally concurrent cases”, referring to the 300,000 murders that took place in the Nazi death camp Auschwitz during the Second World War. During the trial of 2015, Oskar Gröning expressly admitted moral guilt, but not criminal guilt.

    Read more
  • Robots and Rights

    Library blog - November 16, 2017

    Recently, an intelligent and human looking robot named Sophia made global headlines when Saudi Arabia granted the humanoid robot Saudi citizenship. According to the headlines, Saudi Arabia became the first country to grant a robot citizenship. The news caused quite a stir – the female looking robot was not wearing a hijab, she was not accompanied by a male guardian and the robot was awarded citizenship, which made it look like a humanoid intelligent robot was given more rights than women and migrants living in Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia is known for its restrictive policy concerning women’s rights and Saudi women have only recenly been given the right to drive a car. Perhaps it is a bit premature to give an AI humanoid robots like Sophia citizenship rights. Was it a publicity stunt? Yes.

    Read more
  • The Martens Clause: A Bibliography

    Page

    Books Schircks, R., Die Martens’sche Klausel : Rezeption und Rechtsqualität, Baden-Baden, Nomos, 2002. Wolfrum, R., The Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law ; Vol. VI: International Organizations or Institutions, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2012. Articles Arpo, M., “The Martens Clause and International Crimes in Estonia” ENDC Proceedings, Vol. 15, (2012), pp. 101–106. Bernstorff, J., “Martens Clause”, […]

    Read more
  • The Martens Clause: Overview of Treaty Articles

    Page

    The Martens Clause made its first appearance in international law in the Preamble to Convention (II) with Respect to the Laws and Customs of War on Land and its annex: Regulations concerning the Laws and Customs of War on Land in 1899. Hereafter, the Martens Clause has been incorporated several times in other treaties – in […]

    Read more
  • The Martens Clause

    - August 31, 2017

    Friedrich Fromhold Martens was a diplomat and jurist in service of the Russian Empire who made important contributions to the science of international law. He represented Russia at the Hague Peace Conference of 1899, during which he drafted the so-called The Martens Clause, and helped to settle the first cases of international arbitration. We have created a Library special on this topic in order to provide you easy access to our collection.

    Read more
  • The Martens Clause: A New Library Special

    Library blog - August 31, 2017

    The Martens clause is named after the Russian diplomat and international law professor Fyodor Fyodorovich Martens (1845-1909), the Russian delegate at the The Hague Peace Conferences in 1899. The Martens clause came into existence as a diplomatic statement made by diplomat Martens who wanted to come up with a solution for a disagreement between large occupying forces and smaller states. Martens, who was of the opinion that international law should illuminate and set normative standards, created the clause to fill a legal vacuum and help alleviate the horrors of war. The clause serves as a reminder that an act is not just yet permissible when an act of war is not expressly prohibited by international law or customary law.

    Read more
  • ‘Make our planet great again’. The impact of Trump’s decision to leave the Paris Agreement

    Library blog - June 10, 2017

    On 1 June 2017 Donald Trump, President of the United States of America (USA) announced that the USA would withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement: “We’re getting out, but we will start to negotiate, and we will see if we can make a deal that’s fair.” The Paris Climate Agreement which aims at limiting and mitigating the effect of climate change, is an agreement which builds upon the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Trump’s decision has been scorned and condemned by many.

    Read more
  • Symposium and Book launch: “Women’s Human Rights and the Elimination of Discrimination”.

    Library blog - March 16, 2017

    On the occasion of International Women’s Day, a Symposium including a book launch of the latest publication of the Academy, “Women’s Human Rights and the Elimination of Discrimination,” took place in the Auditorium of the Academy building of the Peace Palace on Wednesday 8 March 2017. The symposium was opened by a word of welcome of professor Jean-Marc Thouvenin, Secretary-General of The Hague Academy of International Law. After the welcome address Ms. Saskia Bruines, the Deputy-Mayor of The Hague held a speech about gender equality, women in leadership positions. Unfortunately, the glass ceiling for women in career related matters has not yet been shattered.

    Read more
  • Aleppo, Ankara and Berlin: Atrocities, Violence and Terror

    Library blog - December 21, 2016

    Humanitarian Crisis in Syria. In the eastern part of Aleppo, a Syrian city held by rebels, thousands of civilians were trapped. People were being executed in those parts of Aleppo that had been retaken by Assad forces. Recently the trapped residents that were stuck in a small area with no safe zones posted final “goodbye” messages, pictures and tweets on social media. They have thanked supporters, and questioned how the world allowed the situation in Aleppo to happen. The situation in Syria has been described as a “stain on the world’s collective conscience”.

    Read more