• brexit

    Brexit

    - April 29, 2016

    The British newspaper The Guardian calls the Brexit-referendum the ‘biggest political decision of the century’. British voters: ‘Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?’ On 29 March 2019 — the first date of ‘Brexit’ — the British Parliament (House of Commons) has shown many ‘NO’ ‘s to the Withdrawal Agreement Theresa May had negotiated with the European Union. This library special provides background information about (the) Brexit (process).

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  • Brexit New Titles

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    Selective Bibliography Economic Abeyratne, R., “Brexit and Air Transport Economics in the United Kingdom”, German journal of air and space law: Vierteljahresschrift des Instituts für Luft- und Weltraumrecht der Universität Köln, 66 (2017), No. 2, pp. 212-227. Adlung, R., “Brexit from a WTO/GATS Perspective: Towards an Easy Divorce?”, Journal of world trade: law, economics, public […]

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  • Coral Reefs under Threat?

    Library blog - April 7, 2016

    Are coral reefs condemned to disappear? During the first decade of the 21st century, the intensification of cyclones, the phenomenon of coral bleaching due to ocean warming, outbreaks of a coral-eating starfish and coral diseases left us with this fear. In terms of addressing knowledge gaps, coral reefs are a priority because of their extraordinarily high biological richness and the multitude of products and ecosystem services they provide to human beings. What is the status and legal regime of coral reefs nowadays?

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  • US Policy China Sea and UNCLOS

    Library blog - February 11, 2016

    The Law of the Sea Treaty, formally known as the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, was adopted in 1982. One hundred and sixty-two countries, including China and Russia and the European Union, are signatories to the treaty that governs the world’s oceans. The United States is not. The Convention has been approved by nearly every maritime power and all the permanent members of the UN Security Council, except the United States. Despite being a leading maritime power possessing the largest Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and one of the longest continental shelves, the United States has not ratified UNCLOS.

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  • South China Sea New Titles

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    Territorial Disputes in the South China Sea: Selective Bibliography Agusman, D.D., “The South China Sea UNCLOS Tribunal Award 2016: What It Has Changed and What It Does Mean to Indonesia”, Jurnal hukum internasional, 14 (2017), No. 2, pp. 130-150. November 2018 Almond, R., Clearing the Air above the East China Sea: The Primary Elements of […]

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  • South China Sea Territorial Disputes (continued)

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    The delimitation of the maritime boundaries in the South China Sea should be linked to the question whether the (land reclamations on the) reefs in the South China Sea are islands or rocks or Low Tide Elevations (LTEs). Article 121 UNCLOS has the following three paragraphs: 1. An island is a naturally formed area of […]

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  • Space Mining and (U.S.) Space Law

    Library blog - December 18, 2015

    On November 25, 2015, President Obama signed into law the US Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act (H.R. 2262). As far as space mining is concerned, this legislation will give US space firms the rights to own and sell natural resources they mine from bodies in space, including asteroids. But does the new law risk privatizing a realm that is meant to belong to all of humanity? Is there a violation of international law? Is an international space exploitation regime preferable?

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  • Victory for Privacy in Europe again? ECJ ‘torpedoes’ Safe Harbor

    Library blog - October 9, 2015

    Last Tuesday, October 6, the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg has declared the Safe Harbour Decision invalid. Mr Schrems, a frequent Facebook-user, lodged a complaint with the Irish supervisory authority because in his view leaks from Edward J. Snowden, the former contractor for the National Security Agency, made it clear that American intelligence agencies had almost unfettered access to the data, infringing on Europeans’ rights to privacy.

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  • Legal Blogs and Legal Research: the Verfassungsblog’s Research Project

    News and events - October 9, 2015

    On Wednesday, September 23, in the Berlin State Library, Hannah Birkenkötter lectured about “Legal Blogs as a Means to alter Scientific Communication Structures and Legal Research? Insights from Verfassungsblog’s Research Project.” In recent years, legal blogs rooted in academia have emerged in Germany.

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  • Hague Academy of International Law

    Center for Studies and Research 2015: Access of Individuals to International Justice

    News and events - August 17, 2015

    A warm welcome to the participants of the Centre of Research 2015 of the Hague Academy of International Law and in particular to professors Kamto and Tyagi.

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