• World War I

    - April 6, 2018

    World War I, or the Great War, was a global war, centred in Europe, that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. It involved all of the world’s great powers, which were assembled in two opposing alliances, the Allies the Central Powers. Ultimately, more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, were mobilised in one of the largest wars in history. The outcome of the war subsequently paved the way for various political changes, such as revolutions in many of the nations involved. We have created a Library special on World War I in order to provide you easy access to our collection.

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  • IALL Annual Course 2018

    News and events - March 27, 2018

    The Max Planck Institute is pleased to host the IALL 37th Annual Course “Law in Luxembourg – where local tradition meets European and international innovation”. Luxembourg embodies the constant development of European law by hosting the EU Parliament and Commission, and of course, the Court of Justice of the European Union.

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  • Book Donations The Netherlands Red Cross

    News and events - March 27, 2018

    This month, The Netherlands Red Cross, has generously donated many books to help us expand our International Humanitarian Law collection. The Peace Palace Library would like to express its gratitude and appreciation to the staff members of the International Humanitarian Law Section of the Red Cross who made this possible.

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  • Grotiana

    Grotiana, Volume 38 (2017)

    News and events - January 30, 2018

    Grotiana appears under the auspices of the Grotiana Foundation. The journal’s leading objective is the furtherance of the Grotian tradition. It welcomes any relevant contribution to a better understanding of Grotius’ life and works. The Library contributes with a bibliography on Grotius.

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    The Peace Palace Library is the international law library serving the international legal community. Based in The Hague, the international city for Peace and Justice, the Library plays a essential role in the functioning of international law and is recognised within the community for its excellent legal information services. The Library’s extensive collection covers international […]

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  • Air Warfare and International Law: A Bibliographic Overview

    Library blog - January 4, 2018

    All armed conflicts are covered by the basic rules and principles of the laws of war, wherever the theatre of operations might be, land, sea or air. Although some treaty and customary law specifically refers to certain aspects of aerial warfare, no specific regulation of modern air warfare has yet been adopted. Nevertheless, it is clear that the general principles and rules of international humanitarian law apply. We have created a bibliographic overview on this topic intended as a starting point for your research.

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  • Air Warfare/Bombardments: A Bibliographic Overview

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  • Jerusalem and International Law: A Bibliographic Overview

    Library blog - December 7, 2017

    US President Donald Trump’s pledge to declare Jerusalem as the capital of Israel has caused considerable controversy across the world. If the United States moved the embassy to Jerusalem, it would mean that the US effectively recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. That would overturn 70 years of international consensus, and, many argue, would effectively signal the end of moves to achieve peace between Israelis and Palestinians. We have created a bibliographic overview on this topic intended as a starting point for research.

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  • Jerusalem’s Legal Status: A Bibliographic Overview

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  • Hiroshima A-Bombed Tree Ceremony

    News and events - December 6, 2017

    On the occasion of the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to ICAN, a descendant of a Haki-kima-kaki tree (Diospyros kaki) that has emerged after the Hiroshima atomic attack has found a new home in the garden of the Peace Palace. Seeds from that Hako-kima-kaki tree were sent from Hiroshima to the Hortus botanicus in Leiden. They have been germinated there and have now grown into a beautiful young tree. In short speeches we have commemorated the victims of the atomic attack that remind us of the need to abolish nuclear weapons. The cruelty of atomic bombs and the suffering of the citizens of Horoshima and Nagasaki is engraved in our memory. Yet the beauty of a surviving tree from Japan gives hope for a better and more peaceful world.

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