• Air Warfare/Bombardments: A Bibliographic Overview

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  • Jerusalem and International Law: A Bibliographic Overview

    Library blog - December 7, 2017

    US President Donald Trump’s pledge to declare Jerusalem as the capital of Israel has caused considerable controversy across the world. If the United States moved the embassy to Jerusalem, it would mean that the US effectively recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. That would overturn 70 years of international consensus, and, many argue, would effectively signal the end of moves to achieve peace between Israelis and Palestinians. We have created a bibliographic overview on this topic intended as a starting point for research.

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  • Jerusalem’s Legal Status: A Bibliographic Overview

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  • Hiroshima A-Bombed Tree Ceremony

    News and events - December 6, 2017

    On the occasion of the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to ICAN, a descendant of a Haki-kima-kaki tree (Diospyros kaki) that has emerged after the Hiroshima atomic attack has found a new home in the garden of the Peace Palace. Seeds from that Hako-kima-kaki tree were sent from Hiroshima to the Hortus botanicus in Leiden. They have been germinated there and have now grown into a beautiful young tree. In short speeches we have commemorated the victims of the atomic attack that remind us of the need to abolish nuclear weapons. The cruelty of atomic bombs and the suffering of the citizens of Horoshima and Nagasaki is engraved in our memory. Yet the beauty of a surviving tree from Japan gives hope for a better and more peaceful world.

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  • Book Launch: Oppenheim’s International Law: United Nations

    News and events - November 23, 2017

    On Tuesday, 21 November, the Great Hall of Justice was the scene of the book presentation of the newest book in the Oppenheim series ‘Oppenheim’s International Law: United Nations’. In front of distinguished guests from the International Court of Justice, the Permanent Court of Arbitration, the Hague Academy of International Law, the Carnegie Foundation, and legal specialists from abroad, this book was presented as the result of many years of hard and diligent work by Dame Rosalyn Higgins.

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  • Ratko Mladic Found Guilty

    News and events - November 22, 2017

    Mladic has been sentenced to life in prison. He is convicted of the massacre of more than 7,000 Bosniak men and boys at Srebrenica in 1995 and the siege of Sarajevo in which more than 10,000 people died.

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  • A World Free of Nuclear Weapons

    - November 3, 2017

    Is a world free of nuclear weapons achievable? North Korea is actively developing its nuclear programme, the fate of the Iran nuclear deal is in the balance, and the United States and Russia are both seeking to modernise their nuclear forces. With the Nobel Committee’s decision to honour the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons with the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize, the Committee sent a powerful message of concern. In the same year, the General Assembly decided to convene a UN conference to negotiate a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination.

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  • Hague Academy Registrations 2018 Summer Courses

    News and events - November 1, 2017

    The registrations for the 2018 Summer Courses on Public International Law and Private International Law of The Hague Academy of International Law, as well as for its Centre for Studies and Research, will be opened on November 1st, 2017.

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  • The Library’s Arabic Law collection

    News and events - October 13, 2017

    Since 2011 we have built an extensive collection of books in the Arabic language. The books come from diverse countries, from Mauritania and Morocco to Egypt and Sudan, Lebanon, Syria and Iraq to Yemen and Oman. The main topics we’ve selected are: public international law, international criminal law, Islamic law (almost 400 titles), national positive law and related subjects.

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  • Book Review: War, Peace and International Order?

    Library blog - October 12, 2017

    This book attempts to assess the history and on-going relevance of the 1899 and 1907 Hague peace conferences, the conventions they brought into being, the institutions they established and the precedents they set. The exact legacies of the two conferences remain unclear. On the one hand, diplomatic and military historians, who cast their gaze to 1914, traditionally dismiss the events of 1899 and 1907 as insignificant footnotes on the path to the First World War. On the other, experts in international law posit that The Hague’s foremost legacy lies in the manner in which the conferences progressed the law of war and the concept and application of international justice.

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