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Library blog

These blogs are written by the librarians of the Peace Palace Library. All blogs are dealing with subjects on International Law. Every blog contains links and references to the collection of the Peace Palace Library.

  • The Hague Abduction Convention: Nice in Theory, Difficult in Implementation

    February 15, 2018

    The Hague Convention of 25 October 1980 on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction seeks to protect children from the harmful effects of abduction and retention across international boundaries by providing a procedure to bring about their prompt return. To implement these objectives, the Convention creates a system of close co-operation among the judicial and administrative authorities of the Contracting States and requests Contracting States to use the most expeditious procedures available under their own laws for Convention proceedings. A recent decision of the Japanese Supreme Court shows the conflict between the desire to protect factual situations altered by the wrongful removal or retention of a child, and that of guaranteeing respect for the legal relationships which may underlie such situations.

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  • U.S. Nuclear Strategy

    February 8, 2018

    30 January 2018, U.S. President Trump, during his State of the Union speech, called for a nuclear arsenal “so strong and powerful that it will deter any acts of aggression.”

    The President made clear that his first priority is to protect the United States, allies, and partners. The 2018 Nuclear Posture Review (2018 NPR) lays out important policy changes with regard to U.S. nuclear weapons. The renewal of its nuclear forces will have huge implications for the security of the country and its allies, its public finances and the salience of nuclear weapons in global politics. While the United States has continued to reduce the number and salience of nuclear weapons, others, including Russia and China, have moved in the opposite direction.

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  • European sovereignty Peace Palace blog Jaap Hoeksma

    European Sovereignty

    February 1, 2018

    As newly elected President of the French Republic, Emmanuel Macron has made his mark on the debate about the European Union by introducing the term European sovereignty. In his speech at the Sorbonne of 26 September 2017 he elaborated his vision on European sovereignty in detail. The reason why this term raises distrust among lawyers is that it contains an apparent contradiction. Sovereignty in Europe rests with the member states, not with the Union. According to the highest constitutional court of Germany, the member states are the ‘masters of the treaties’, not the Union. So, has President Macron merely launched a political slogan or will closer examination reveal that his approach gives fresh impetus to the smouldering debate about the future of Europe?

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  • COE dataprotection

    International Data Privacy Day 2018

    January 25, 2018

    People’s personal data are being processed every second; at work, in their relations with public authorities, in the health field, when they buy goods or services, travel or surf the Internet. Individuals are generally unfamiliar with the risks related to the protection of their personal data and of their rights in this respect. “Respecting Privacy, Safeguarding Data and Enabling Trust” is the theme for Data Privacy Day 2018, an international effort held annually on January 28 to create awareness about the importance of privacy and protecting personal information. We have created a bibliographic overview on this topic intended as a starting point for research. It provides materials available in the Peace Palace Library catalogue, both in print and electronic format.

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  • Former Nazi Officer’s Plea for Mercy Rejected

    January 18, 2018

    The mercy plea of Oskar Gröning, a 96-year-old former Nazi officer, has been denied. On July 15, 2015, Mr Gröning, who is also called the ‘bookkeeper of Auschwitz’, was condemned of being “guilty of aiding and abetting murder in three hundred thousand legally concurrent cases”, referring to the 300,000 murders that took place in the Nazi death camp Auschwitz during the Second World War. During the trial of 2015, Oskar Gröning expressly admitted moral guilt, but not criminal guilt.

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  • Remembering Felix Moscheles (1833-1917)

    January 11, 2018

    On December 22, the Peace Palace Library, the International Network of Museums for Peace (INMP) and the Bertha von Suttner Peace Institute organized a commemorative meeting to mark the 100th anniversary of the death of Felix Stone Moscheles. Moscheles was a 19th century peace activist and painter. He was one of the best-known pacifists of his time, a familiar face in the International Peace Movement and a close friend of Bertha von Suttner, the first female recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He participated in the Hague Peace Conferences and was a staunch supporter of international arbitration. This blog will briefly discuss his life and will mainly focus on his peace activities.

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  • Air Warfare and International Law: A Bibliographic Overview

    January 4, 2018

    All armed conflicts are covered by the basic rules and principles of the laws of war, wherever the theatre of operations might be, land, sea or air. Although some treaty and customary law specifically refers to certain aspects of aerial warfare, no specific regulation of modern air warfare has yet been adopted. Nevertheless, it is clear that the general principles and rules of international humanitarian law apply. We have created a bibliographic overview on this topic intended as a starting point for your research.

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  • Benjamin Ferenczpad Unveiled

    Peace Palace Library 2017 in Review

    December 22, 2017

    As we turn the page on 2017, a lot has happened in the world and also specific on the international law arena. In this blog the Peace Palace Library looks back on the most notable international law news and Peace Palace Library lectures and events. On 22 November 2017, Ratko Mladić, the former commander of the Bosnian Serb army and one-time fugitive from international justice has been sentenced to life imprisonment after being convicted of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity by the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

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  • A Historic Moment for International Criminal Justice: ICC Jurisdiction Activated over the Crime of Aggression

    December 15, 2017

    A historic decision has been taken to activate the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (ICC) over the Crime of Aggression, at the Sixteenth meeting of Assembly of States Parties (ASP) to the Statute of the ICC in New York. The ASP adopted a resolution that adds the crime of aggression to the crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. This achievement has only been possible due to the work of many NGO’s, States and ceaseless individuals, in particular the former Prosecutor at the Nuremberg Tribunal, Benjamin Ferencz . He worked for many decades with an unending patience to achieve this breakthrough.

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  • Jerusalem and International Law: A Bibliographic Overview

    December 7, 2017

    US President Donald Trump’s pledge to declare Jerusalem as the capital of Israel has caused considerable controversy across the world. If the United States moved the embassy to Jerusalem, it would mean that the US effectively recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. That would overturn 70 years of international consensus, and, many argue, would effectively signal the end of moves to achieve peace between Israelis and Palestinians. We have created a bibliographic overview on this topic intended as a starting point for research.

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