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Library blog

These blogs are written by the librarians of the Peace Palace Library. All blogs are dealing with subjects on International Law. Every blog contains links and references to the collection of the Peace Palace Library.

  • Former Nazi Officer’s Plea for Mercy Rejected

    January 19, 2018

    The mercy plea of Oskar Gröning, a 96-year-old former Nazi officer, has been denied. On July 15, 2015, Mr Gröning, who is also called the ‘bookkeeper of Auschwitz’, was condemned of being “guilty of aiding and abetting murder in three hundred thousand legally concurrent cases”, referring to the 300,000 murders that took place in the Nazi death camp Auschwitz during the Second World War. During the trial of 2015, Oskar Gröning expressly admitted moral guilt, but not criminal guilt.

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  • Remembering Felix Moscheles (1833-1917)

    January 16, 2018

    On December 22, the Peace Palace Library, the International Network of Museums for Peace (INMP) and the Bertha von Suttner Peace Institute organized a commemorative meeting to mark the 100th anniversary of the death of Felix Stone Moscheles. Moscheles was a 19th century peace activist and painter. He was one of the best-known pacifists of his time, a familiar face in the International Peace Movement and a close friend of Bertha von Suttner, the first female recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He participated in the Hague Peace Conferences and was a staunch supporter of international arbitration. This blog will briefly discuss his life and will mainly focus on his peace activities.

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  • Air Warfare and International Law: A Bibliographic Overview

    January 4, 2018

    All armed conflicts are covered by the basic rules and principles of the laws of war, wherever the theatre of operations might be, land, sea or air. Although some treaty and customary law specifically refers to certain aspects of aerial warfare, no specific regulation of modern air warfare has yet been adopted. Nevertheless, it is clear that the general principles and rules of international humanitarian law apply. We have created a bibliographic overview on this topic intended as a starting point for your research.

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  • Benjamin Ferenczpad Unveiled

    Peace Palace Library 2017 in Review

    December 22, 2017

    As we turn the page on 2017, a lot has happened in the world and also specific on the international law arena. In this blog the Peace Palace Library looks back on the most notable international law news and Peace Palace Library lectures and events. On 22 November 2017, Ratko Mladić, the former commander of the Bosnian Serb army and one-time fugitive from international justice has been sentenced to life imprisonment after being convicted of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity by the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

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  • A Historic Moment for International Criminal Justice: ICC Jurisdiction Activated over the Crime of Aggression

    December 15, 2017

    A historic decision has been taken to activate the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (ICC) over the Crime of Aggression, at the Sixteenth meeting of Assembly of States Parties (ASP) to the Statute of the ICC in New York. The ASP adopted a resolution that adds the crime of aggression to the crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. This achievement has only been possible due to the work of many NGO’s, States and ceaseless individuals, in particular the former Prosecutor at the Nuremberg Tribunal, Benjamin Ferencz . He worked for many decades with an unending patience to achieve this breakthrough.

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  • Jerusalem and International Law: A Bibliographic Overview

    December 7, 2017

    US President Donald Trump’s pledge to declare Jerusalem as the capital of Israel has caused considerable controversy across the world. If the United States moved the embassy to Jerusalem, it would mean that the US effectively recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. That would overturn 70 years of international consensus, and, many argue, would effectively signal the end of moves to achieve peace between Israelis and Palestinians. We have created a bibliographic overview on this topic intended as a starting point for research.

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  • Russia at the 2018 Winter Olympics?

    November 30, 2017

    Russia has been banned from the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, which begin on 9 February 2018. September 2017, the world’s leading anti-doping agencies have come together to demand Russia be banned from the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang next year and to warn the International Olympic Committee it must stop paying lip service to the fight against doping. In november 2017, the IOC’s Oswald Commission sanctioned 25 Russian athletes for using doping at the XXll Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, in 2014. The Russian athletes have been declared ineligible to be accredited in any capacity for all editions of the Games of the Olympiad and the Olympic Winter Games subsequent to the Sochi Olympic Winter Games.

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  • ICTY Sentences Ratko Mladić to Life Imprisonment

    November 23, 2017

    Ratko Mladić, the former commander of the Bosnian Serb army and one-time fugitive from international justice, has been sentenced to life imprisonment after being convicted of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity by the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) at The Hague. The “Butcher of Bosnia” to his enemies and critics, Mladić was the most notorious of the ICTY’s 161 indictees, along with former Bosnian Serb political leader Radovan Karadžić and late Serbian President Slobodan Milosević. The ICTY convicted Mladić of crimes it labelled as some of the “most heinous” in human history, in one of the highest profile war crimes cases since the post-World War Two Nuremberg trials of Germany’s Nazi leadership.

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  • Robots and Rights

    November 16, 2017

    Recently, an intelligent and human looking robot named Sophia made global headlines when Saudi Arabia granted the humanoid robot Saudi citizenship. According to the headlines, Saudi Arabia became the first country to grant a robot citizenship. The news caused quite a stir – the female looking robot was not wearing a hijab, she was not accompanied by a male guardian and the robot was awarded citizenship, which made it look like a humanoid intelligent robot was given more rights than women and migrants living in Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia is known for its restrictive policy concerning women’s rights and Saudi women have only recenly been given the right to drive a car. Perhaps it is a bit premature to give an AI humanoid robots like Sophia citizenship rights. Was it a publicity stunt? Yes.

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  • Key Connecting Factors in International Child Abduction Cases

    November 9, 2017

    One of the main problems in international child abduction cases is to determine which country’s courts should decide a case and which legal system should apply. The subject of this blog is to give some insights in the main connecting factors in international child abduction cases, with an emphasis on the “habitual residence” of very young children as connecting factor. The main question is whether the parental intentions or the physical presence of a child in a state is primordial to establish habitual residence.

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