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Library blog

These blogs are written by the librarians of the Peace Palace Library. All blogs are dealing with subjects on International Law. Every blog contains links and references to the collection of the Peace Palace Library.

  • May We Have Your Consent?

    May 24, 2018

    On May 25th, 2018, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will come into effect. One of the major areas of change, is that companies will need the customer’s consent for having their personal data and sending emails about newsletters. The GDPR requires that consent should be “freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous”. The Peace Palace Library like to be in accordance with the GDPR. We are keen to continue informing you and inviting you to our lectures and events in the future, but require your permission to do so. You will receive an email for your consent. Without your permission the Peace Palace Library will not be able to send you any emails with latest news, events of lectures. So if you like us to continue informing you about our services, new titles, our latest news, lectures and events, please give us your consent!

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  • The ESMA Mega Trial: Crimes against Humanity during the Last Dictatorship in Argentina 1976-1983

    May 18, 2018

    This blog has been written by Argentinean lawyer Federico Gaitan Hairabedian. From 2014 to 2017, he has taken on the role of a plaintiff attorney for CELS (Centre of Legal and Social Studies) in the ESMA Mega-case for the crimes committed at the Naval School of Mechanical Engineering (ESMA) representing the victims and families of those disappeared during the military dictatorship in Argentina between 1976-1983. ESMA functioned as an illegal, secret detention center during the so-called National Reorganization Process. It was the largest detention center for thousands of instances of forced disappearance, torture, and illegal execution.

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  • 70 Years of the International Law Commission: Drawing a Balance for the Future

    May 3, 2018

    This week the International Law Commission starts its seventieth session in New York. For the past seventy years, the Commission has played an indispensable role in the progressive development of international law and its codification. To mark the seventieth anniversary of the Commission, a photo exhibit is on display at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, which features images of the Peace Palace Library Photo Collection. The exhibit explores the achievements of the Commission and places them in historical context – a history in which the city of The Hague plays a special role. A guest blog by Bart Smit Duijzentkunst.

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  • EU and Mexico Reach New Agreement on Trade

    April 26, 2018

    Saturday, 21 April 2018, the European Union and Mexico reached an agreement on a new free trade deal. “With this agreement, Mexico joins Canada, Japan and Singapore in the growing list of partners willing to work with the EU in defending open, fair and rules-based trade,” said European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker. The EU and Mexico wanted to update a trade deal agreed 21 years ago that largely covers industrial goods. The European Union and Mexico agreed in 2015 to modernize their trade relations and held two rounds of talks last year. The election of U.S. President Donald Trump has reinforced Mexico’s need to reduce its reliance on the U.S. imports and exports.

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  • Polishing the Golden Rule of International Copyright Protection

    April 23, 2018

    This week’s fascinating guest blog concerns the national treatment principle that deals with the issue of non-discrimination in international intellectual property law. The blog provides a brief overview of the development of this eminent principle in international conventions protecting copyright. Dr. Danny Friedmann combines intellectual rigor with clever anecdotes in this blog. Find out why Charles Dickens complained about the unfairness of the massive piracy of his books in the United States and how a former copyright pirate like Belgium could transform itself to a copyright advocate.

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  • Looted Ethiopian Treasure

    April 19, 2018

    On April 13, it was the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Maqdala between the British empire and the Abyssinian empire, in modern day Ethiopia. The battle of 1868, which basically started as an expedition to free British hostages taken by the Abyssinian emperor, resulted in a decisive victory for the British and the suicide of the Abyssinian emperor Tewodros. In the aftermath, the British troops plundered the empire and loaded 15 elephants and almost 200 mules with their spoils. The Victoria and Albert Museum now hosts a special display with a number of the artifacts. This exposition raises the issue of the restitution of the looted artifacts to Ethiopia.

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  • Revolutionary Breakthrough in EU Research

    April 16, 2018

    The debate about the future of Europe has been deadlocked ever since the start of the process of European integration in the midst of the 20th century. According to one school of thought the process had to result in the emergence of a federal State of Europe, while another theory held that the participating states should aspire to form a Europe of Nation States or a Europe des Patries. Both theories underlined that there were no other options available. The present blog aims to demonstrate that both theories are outdated and have to be replaced.

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  • Mali War Crimes Suspect Mr. Al Hassan Makes Initial Appearance Before the ICC

    April 5, 2018

    After the Al Mahdi case, a landmark trial, a second case has been referred to the International Criminal Court (ICC) on charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in Timbuktu, Mali between 2012 and 2013. Another Malian national, 40-year-old Mr Al Hassan Ag Abdoul Aziz Ag Mohamed Ag Mahmoud, faces charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. He has been accused of destroying holy places, mausoleums of Muslim saints in Timbuktu and of enforcing a policy of forced marriage which had led to sexual slavery and rape of women and girls. The alleged crimes were committed between 2012 and 2013 when Timbuktu was under the control of militant islamists. From April 2012 until January 2013, Mr Al Hassan was head of the Islamic Police.

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  • Collective Expulsion of Russian Diplomats

    March 29, 2018

    The collective expulsion of Russian diplomats was all over the news the past few days. The United States, Canada and 18 European countries have ordered the expulsion of dozens of Russian diplomats in response to the nerve agent attack in the United Kingdom. We have created a bibliographic overview on diplomacy and expulsion, intended as a starting point for research. It provides materials available in the Peace Palace Library catalogue, both in print and electronic format.

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  • The African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights: Reflections on Recent Progress

    March 21, 2018

    Recent years have seen the African Court begin to find its stride. Its willingness to expand its jurisdiction and defend vulnerable groups against powerful states has shown it to be a bold court with a desire to vigorously uphold its mandate to protect human rights on the Continent. Whilst it indeed seems that the Court has the aspiration to assert itself, the fact that so few states have deposited their Special Declarations allowing individuals and NGOs direct access to the Court continues to hamper its effectiveness. The Court’s outreach efforts to engage with states and civil society in response to this paucity of Special Declarations do appear to be having some success, however, progress has been slow and the Court may have to have recourse to other means to improve state engagement in future.

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