Traités

Introduction

La définition du traité qui fasse le plus autorité est celle de la Convention de Vienne sur le droit des traités. Selon l'article 2 de cet accord multilatéral, un "traité" est un "accord international conclu par écrit entre États et régi par le droit international, qu’il soit consigné dans un instrument unique ou dans deux ou plusieurs instruments connexes, et quelle que soit sa dénomination particulière." Un traité conclu entre un ou plusieurs États et une ou plusieurs organisations internationales, ou entre organisations internationales est également considéré comme un traité, voir la Convention de Vienne sur le droit des traités entre États et organisations internationales ou entre organisations internationales. Selon l'article 38 du Statut de la Cour internationale de justice, la Cour doit appliquer "les conventions internationales les traités, soit générales, soit spéciales, établissant des règles expressément reconnues par les États en litige" lorsqu'un différend lui est soumis. Dès lors, il est permis de conclure que les traités sont l'une des sources principales du droit international public. 

Le présent guide de recherche se veut un point de départ pour mener des recherches sur le droit des traités. Il fournit les textes juridiques de base disponibles à la Bibliothèque du Palais de la Paix, qu'il s'agisse de documents imprimés ou de documents sous format électronique. La section intitulée "Bibliographie sélective" présente une sélection de manuels, d'articles importants, de bibliographies, de publications périodiques, de publications en série et de documents pertinents. Des liens permettent de rejoindre le catalogue PPL. Le code de classification de la bibliothèque 131. Droit des traités et le mot-matière (mot-clef) Traités sont des instruments permettant de faire une recherche dans le catalogue. Une attention particulière est prêtée à nos inscriptions aux bases de données, revues électroniques, livres électroniques et autres ressources électroniques. Enfin, le présent guide de recherche contient des liens vers des sites Internet pertinents et d'autres ressources en ligne présentant un intérêt particulier.

Tagged with:

Bibliographie

Reference works

Books

Articles

2019

2018 and before

Documents

Periodicals, serial publications

Systematic classification → Public international law

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Choix de bibliothécaire

  • Chesterman, S. (et al.) (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of United Nations Treaties, Oxford, Oxford University Press, Forthcoming Aug. 2019.

    Chesterman, S. (et al.) (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of United Nations Treaties, Oxford, Oxford University Press, Forthcoming Aug. 2019.

    The United Nations is a vital part of the international order. Yet this book argues that the greatest contribution of the UN is not what it has achieved (improvements in health and economic development, for example) or avoided (global war, say, or the use of weapons of mass destruction). It is, instead, the process through which the UN has transformed the structure of international law to expand the range and depth of subjects covered by treaties. This handbook offers the first sustained analysis of the UN as a forum in which and an institution through which treaties are negotiated and implemented. Chapters are written by authors from different fields, including academics and practitioners; lawyers and specialists from other social sciences (international relations, history, and science); professionals with an established reputation in the field; younger researchers and diplomats involved in the negotiation of multilateral treaties; and scholars with a broader view on the issues involved. The volume thus provides unique insights into UN treaty-making. Through the thematic and technical parts, it also offers a lens through which to view challenges lying ahead and the possibilities and limitations of this understudied aspect of international law and relations.

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  • Klinger, J. (et al.) (eds.), Between the Lines of the Vienna Convention?: Canons and Other Principles of Interpretation in Public International Law, Alphen a/d Rijn, Kluwer Law International, 2019.

    Klinger, J. (et al.) (eds.), Between the Lines of the Vienna Convention?: Canons and Other Principles of Interpretation in Public International Law, Alphen a/d Rijn, Kluwer Law International, 2019.

    This handbook analyses certain particularly recognizable canons and principles of interpretation that are not expressly codified in the Vienna Convention, but that are arguably still authorized ‘between the lines’. This volume represents the first modern, freestanding analysis of such canons and principles, their utility in public international law, their role in treaty interpretation and their relationship with the Vienna Convention regime.

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  • Bowman, M.J., and D. Kritsiotis (eds.), Conceptual and Contextual Perspectives on the Modern Law of Treaties, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2018. [e-book]

    Bowman, M.J., and D. Kritsiotis (eds.), Conceptual and Contextual Perspectives on the Modern Law of Treaties, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2018.

    In recent years there has been a flourishing body of work on the Law of Treaties, crucial for all fields within international law. However, scholarship on modern treaty law falls into two distinct strands which have not previously been effectively synthesized. One concerns the investigation of concepts which are fundamental to or inherent in the law of treaties generally - such as consent, object and purpose, breach of obligation and provisional application - while the other focuses upon the application of treaties and of treaty law in particular substantive (e.g. human rights, international humanitarian law, investment protection, environmental regulation) or institutional contexts (including the Security Council, the World Health Organization, the International Labour Organization and the World Trade Organization). This volume represents the culmination of a series of collaborative explorations by leading experts into the operation, development and effectiveness of the modern law of treaties, as viewed through these contrasting perspectives.

     

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  • Buga, I., Modification of Treaties by Subsequent Practice, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2018. [e-book]

    Buga, I., Modification of Treaties by Subsequent Practice, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2018.

    Treaties must undergo transformation and modernization to reflect changing norms and developments in international law. But treaties can be notoriously difficult to amend by formal means. One crucial way in which treaty evolution takes place is through subsequent practice, a well-established tool for treaty interpretation. While its initial aim is to shed light on the parties’ original intention, over time, subsequent practice acquires a force of its own and may come to evidence their contemporary understanding of the treaty. Subsequent practice may even diverge so far from treaty provisions that it can no longer be said to constitute an act of treaty interpretation, but becomes, in effect, one of modification. Furthermore, such practice can give rise to new norms of customary international law, which, in turn, may impact pre-existing treaty provisions. The modification of treaties by subsequent practice extends to all fields of international law, from the law of the sea, environmental law, and investment law, to humanitarian law and human rights. Such modifications can have significant practical consequences, from revising or creating new rights and obligations, to establishing new institutional mechanisms. Determining the point when the ‘switch’ from treaty interpretation to treaty modification occurs, however, is itself an act of interpretation. It poses difficulty to legal scholars and dispute settlement bodies alike, especially in light of the silence of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties on this point, and impacts States’ expectations as to their treaty obligations. This book addresses this insufficiently explored issue of international significance.

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  • Popa, L.E., Patterns of Treaty Interpretation as Anti-Fragmentation Tools: A Comparative Analysis with a Special Focus on the ECtHR, WTO and ICJ, Cham, Springer, 2018.

    Popa, L.E., Patterns of Treaty Interpretation as Anti-Fragmentation Tools: A Comparative Analysis with a Special Focus on the ECtHR, WTO and ICJ, Cham, Springer, 2018.

    This book investigates whether treaty interpretation at the ECtHR and WTO, which are sometimes perceived as promoting ‘self-contained’ regimes, could constitute a means for unifying international law, or, conversely, might exacerbate the fragmentation of international law. In this regard, the practice of the ICJ on treaty interpretation is used for comparison, since the ICJ has made the greatest contribution to the development and clarification of international law rules and principles. Providing a critical analysis of cases at the ICJ, ECtHR and WTO, both prior to and since the adoption of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, the book reveals how the ECtHR and WTO apply the general rules of treaty interpretation in patterns which are similar to those used by the ICJ to address difficulties in interpreting the text of treaties. Viewed in the light of the ECtHR’s and WTO’s interpretative practices, both the VCLT’s general rules of interpretation and the ICJ’s interpretative practice serve to counteract the fragmentation of international law.

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  • Dörr, O. and K. Schmalenbach (eds.), Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties: a Commentary (2nd ed.), Heidelberg , Springer, 2018.

    Dörr, O. and K. Schmalenbach (eds.), Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties: a Commentary (2nd ed.), Heidelberg , Springer, 2018.

    The Commentary on the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties provides an in-depth article-by-article analysis of all of the Vienna Convention's provisions. Each provision's analysis consists of (I) Purpose and Function of the Article, (II) Historical Background with Negotiating History, (III) Elements of the Article and finally (IV) Treaties of International Organizations. In short, the present Commentary contains a comprehensive legal analysis of all aspects of the international law of treaties. Furthermore, where the law of treaties reaches into other fields of international law, e.g. the law of state responsibility, the relevant interfaces are discussed and contextualized. With its focus on international practice, the Commentary is an invaluable reference for both academia and practitioners of international law.

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Database

Blogs

  • The Treaties of Ryswick (1697)

    In 1697, the Huis ter Nieuburch in Rijswijk was the scene of the negotiations which led to so-called “Peace of Ryswick”. These negotiations sought to end the Nine-Years War between France on one side and the Grand Alliance of Spain, England, The Dutch Republic and The Holy Roman Empire. The Peace Treaty of Rijswijk was not a single document but consisted of a number of treaties which were signed during the months of September and October 1697. The treaties have been scanned in order to familiarize researchers with our historical collection.

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  • The Peace of Christmas Eve

    Peace is an elusive thing. Everyone wants peace, yet few seem to actually possess it in any substantive form. For many, the attraction of the Christmas season is the momentary fulfillment of that dream, the wonderful moment of ‘Peace on Earth’. For one night, it seems possible. As Christmas approaches, we experience a sense of […]

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See also

More Research guides on Droit international public

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