Première guerre mondiale

Introduction

World War I - Research Guide International Law

La Première guerre mondiale - ou la Grande Guerre - est un conflit mondial qui débuta le 28 juillet 1914 pour prendre fin le 11 novembre 1918. Toutes les grandes puissances mondiales furent impliquées, au sein ou aux côtés de l'une ou l'autre des deux alliances adverses: la Triple-Entente (Royaume-Uni, France et Russie) et la Triple Alliance (Empire allemand et Empire austro-hongrois). Ces alliances connurent à la fois des réorganisations et des élargissements au fur et à mesure que d'autres nations entraient dans le conflit: l'Italie, le Japon et les États-Unis rejoignirent la Triple-Entente, tandis que l'Empire ottoman et la Bulgarie intégrèrent la Triple Alliance. Au total, plus de 70 millions de militaires - parmi lesquels 60 millions d'européens - furent mobilisés dans ce qui fut un des conflits les plus importants de l'Histoire. Plus de 9 millions de combattants y trouvèrent la mort, en raison notamment des progrès technologiques ayant mené à une augmentation considérable de la létalité des armes, sans que les améliorations correspondantes en termes de protection et de mobilité aient existé. Cette situation a provoqué de part et d'autre le recours à une guerre de tranchées et à l'envoi de véritables vagues humaines à l'attaque, à une échelle jamais atteinte auparavant; choix ayant eu pour résultat un coût extrême en terme de vies humaines. Pour nombre des États ayant pris part au conflit, la résolution de ce dernier a marqué le début de profonds changements politiques - y compris de révolutions. Les collections de la Bibliothèque portant sur la Grande Guerre abordent des champs précis du droit international tels que: le droit des conflits armés, la Conférence de paix de Paris, les traités de paix de 1919-1920, les indemnités de guerre et les politiques de mémoire.

Le présent guide de recherche se veut un point de départ pour mener des recherches sur la Première guerre mondiale. Il fournit les textes juridiques de base disponibles à la Bibliothèque du Palais de la Paix, qu’il s’agisse de documents imprimés ou de documents sous format électronique. La section intitulée “Bibliographie sélective” présente une sélection de manuels, d’articles importants, de bibliographies, de publications périodiques, de publications en série et de documents pertinents. Des liens permettent de rejoindre le catalogue PPL. Le code de classification de la bibliothèque 488. Guerre mondiale de 1914: En général et le mot-matière (mot-clef) Guerre mondiale de 1914 sont des instruments permettant de faire une recherche dans le catalogue. Une attention particulière est prêtée à nos inscriptions aux bases de données, revues électroniques, livres électroniques et autres ressources électroniques. Enfin, le présent guide de recherche contient des liens vers des sites Internet pertinents et d’autres ressources en ligne présentant un intérêt particulier.

La Bibliothèque du Palais de la Paix commémorera le centenaire de la Première guerre mondiale par une série d'articles publiés sur le site, cliquez ici.

Bibliographie

Reference works

Recent books

Articles on World War I and International Law

Documents

Periodicals, serial publications

Bibliographies

Systematic classification → History: World War I

New titles


1. "Judges' Sons make the Final Sacrifice"
"Judges' Sons make the Final Sacrifice" : the Story of the Australian Judicial Community in the First World War / Tony Cunneen In: Australian Law Journal = ISSN 0004-9611: vol. 91, issue 4, page 302-312. - 2017
Keywords: Australia, Judges, Lawyers, World War I, Historiography,

Choix de bibliothécaire

  • Cox, A., Wilsonian Approaches to American Conflicts: From the War of 1812 to the First Gulf War, London; New York: Routledge, 2017.

    This book explores US foreign policy, specifically the history of America’s entry into the War of 1812, the First World War, the Korean War and the First Gulf War. Using a historical case study approach, it demonstrates how the Wilsonian Framework can give us a unique understanding of why the United States chose to go to war in those four conflicts. Cox argues that the Wilsonian Framework is an important concern for decision makers in the US and that democracy promotion and the concept of international law are driving factors in each of these decisions to go to war. The realist and economic explanations of these conflicts are not sufficient and we must draw on Wilsonianism to gain a clear understanding of these conflicts. Drawing on the history of American liberalism and the work of Walter Russel Mead and Tony Smith, the book presents a definition of Wilsonianism that represents a broad span of the history of The Republic, in order to show consistency across time. It also establishes why the realist and economic explanations fail to provide sufficient explanatory power and how the Wilsonian Framework can give important insights into these conflicts. This book will be of interest to international historians and international relations scholars at both postgraduate and scholar level. It will also be of use to those wishing to conduct future research into the motivations that drive the foreign and security policies of the United States.

    View this title in our link resolver Plinklet
  • Zanders, J.P., Innocence Slaughtered: Gas and the Transformation of Warfare and Society, London, Uniform Press, 2016.

    Among the many deadly innovations that were first deployed on the battlefields of World War I, none was as terrifying - or notorious - as poison gas. First used by the Germans on April 22, 1915, gas was instantly seen as a new way of fighting war, an indication that total warfare was here, and would be far more devastating and cruel than anyone had imagined. This book investigates the effects of chlorine gas at all levels, from its effects on individual soldiers to its impact on combat operations and tactics to its eventual role in the push to codify rules of warfare. Gathering eleven historians and experts on chemical weapons, Innocence Slaughtered puts WWI's cruelest innovation into its historical, industrial, and social context.

    View this title in our link resolver Plinklet

Database

Free Access

Subscription-based

Blogs

  • Paardenmarkt: A Toxic Legacy of the Great War

    Countries that in the past have chosen to take the easy way out by disposing their chemical warfare material by ocean dumping are now realizing the unpleasant fact that this material, although out of sight, is not out of mind because it presents threats to public health and the environment. Here, the example of one of the largest World War I ammunition dump sites in Europe, the Paardenmarkt, a narrow submerged sand-bank called off the coast of Belgium.

    Read more
  • International Congress of Women of 1915

    This Spring, on April 28, the Peace Palace will participate in the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the International Congress of Women that took place in the city of The Hague in 1915. The women who attended this Congress a century ago, were suffragists who up until that time, met every other year through their national organization at the International Women Suffrage Alliance. A small delegation headed by Dutch suffragist and physician Dr. Aletta Jacobs, believed it to be important to organize a meeting, even during wartime, to discuss the principles of constructive peace.

    Read more
  • Lecture: There is Only War - Neutrals Reflect on the First World War, Tuesday, 2 December, 17:15 h.

    It should not surprise us that war is never only about the actors waging it. Most non-belligerents in the First World War came into the war with clear expectations of what their neutrality meant and what their country’s international obligations were. Those expectations had been shaped by a century of precedent within an environment that enhanced and protected the rights of neutrals. This Peace Palace Library lecture by Maartje Abbenhuis starts at 17:15. Doors open at 17 h. Entrance fee € 4. Visit of the exhibition this day possible until 17 h.

    Read more
  • World War One Poetry and Music, Tuesday 25 November, Peace Palace

    On Tuesday 25 November 2014, 19:45 hrs, a special ‘war poetry’ evening will take place in the Peace Palace to commemorate the First World War, based on a selection by Onno Kosters. Poems of well-known poets from Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy, such as Siegfried Sassoon and John McCrae, Georg Trakl, Guillaume Apollinaire will be recited. The reading of the poems will be interlarded with music compositions and performances by Rénan Zelada closely linked to the First World War. A guided tour of the exhibition ‘Peace Illusion Disturbed’ is included.

    Read more
  • Filmscreening 'Joyeux Noel', Tuesday, 18 November, Peace Palace

    Joyeux Noel captures a rare moment of grace from one of the worst wars in the history of mankind, World War I. On Christmas Eve, 1914, as German, French, and Scottish regiments face each other from their respective trenches, a musical call-and-response turns into an impromptu cease-fire, trading chocolates and champagne, playing soccer, and comparing pictures of their wives. But when Christmas ends, the war returns. Tuesday, 18 November, Peace Palace, 16.00 h, start film 17.00 h. Only by registration: ku-s1@denh.auswaertiges-amt.de

    Read more
  • The Illusion of Peace Disturbed: Lectures, Europeana Collection Day, Film and Exhibitions

    Events and commemorative ceremonies will be taking place during 2014 to 2018, marking the Centenary of the First World War. The Peace Palace Library, in collaboration with the Alliance Française, organizes a Conference Day on Friday, 14 November, with lectures on the First World War and presents two exhibitions in the main entrance hall of the Peace Palace: The First World War in Posters & “Lettres d’un soldat” – letters of a French soldier to his wife (1914-1915). Furthermore, the feature film “Joyeux Noël”, and a Europeana Collection Day to be held in the Library next Saturday.

    Read more
  • The Destruction of the Cathedral of Reims, 1914

    On 20 September 1914, German shellfire burned, damaged and destroyed important parts of the magnificent Cathedral of Reims. The destruction of the Cathedral was generally regarded as an act of sheer vandalism. At the time, it was generally admitted by writers on international law that if the military commander of a besieged place used a church or other building whose immunity had been established, as a stronghold, a storehouse, or an observatory, the besieger might bombard the site without being held responsible for damages caused in consequence of their proximity to other buildings which are liable to bombardment. Even the French war manual itself admitted this.

    Read more
  • A Supreme Offence against International Morality and the Sanctity of Treaties: William II of Hohenzollern and the Treaty of Versailles

    Early during World War I, jurists and statesmen in both France and Great-Britain, such as Larnaude and Lapradelle, had advocated the German Emperor William II to be arrested and brought to trial. The principle that military officers should be held personally responsible for orders in violation of the laws and customs of war, if pushed to its logical limits, would render commanders-in-chief, that is heads of State, liable for illegal acts for which they are responsible, directly or indirectly. And in Germany, there was one commander-in-chief: the Emperor William II.

    Read more
  • Article 247 of the Treaty of Versailles and the “Mystic Lamb”

    The ‘biography’ of the Ghent Altarpiece, also called the Adoration of the Mystic Lamb, reads like a thriller. From the beginning this fascinating work was the object of passionate desire to either possess or destroy it. During the centuries of its existence, the altarpiece witnessed religious upheavals in the Southern Netherlands, came close to being destroyed during these outbreaks of iconoclasm and was damaged when moved to save guard it or when stolen. It endured fires, Napoleon’s looting army and two world wars. Parts of it were stolen, burned, recovered and stolen again and again.
    Article 247 of the Treaty of Versailles and the “Mystic Lamb”

    Read more
  • German War Reparations (WW I) Financially Ended

    Nearly 92 years after the official end of World War I, Germany made its final reparations-related payment for the Great War on October 3, thereby ending the conflict financially. The German newspaper Die Welt discovered a last installment for the Londoner Schuldenabkommen of 69,9 million euro’s in the German budget. Not being a direct reparations settlement but rather the final sum owed on bonds that were issued between 1924 and 1930 and sold to foreign (mostly American) investors, but then never paid.
    German War Reparations (WW I) Financially Ended

    Read more

See also

More Research guides on Guerre et Paix

PPL keywords

Other suggestions

Systematic classification → History: World War I