Library Specials

  • A World Free of Nuclear Weapons

    November 3, 2017

    With it’s recent decision to honour the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, the Nobel Committee has sent a powerful message of concern that should be attached to nuclear weapons. It comes at a moment when North Korea is actively developing its nuclear programme, the fate of the Iran nuclear deal is in the balance, and the United States and Russia are both seeking to modernise their nuclear forces. ICAN campaigned for the drafting of an entirely new disarmament agreement – the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons – that was opened for signature at the United Nations in July this year. We have created a Library special on nuclear disarmament in order to provide you easy access to our collection.

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  • Balfour Declaration, 1917

    October 6, 2017

    The Balfour Declaration of 1917 had many long-lasting consequences. It greatly increased popular support for Zionism, and led to the creation of Mandatory Palestine, which later became Israel and the Palestinian territories. As a result it is considered to have caused the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, often described as the world’s most intractable conflict. We have created a Library special on this topic in order to provide you easy access to our collection.

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  • The Martens Clause

    August 31, 2017

    Friedrich Fromhold Martens was a diplomat and jurist in service of the Russian Empire who made important contributions to the science of international law. He represented Russia at the Hague Peace Conference of 1899, during which he drafted the so-called The Martens Clause, and helped to settle the first cases of international arbitration. We have created a Library special on this topic in order to provide you easy access to our collection.

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  • The Hague Academy Summer Courses 2017

    July 6, 2017

    We welcome all students of the The Hague Academy of International Law’s summer courses, first period 10 July – 28 July (Public International Law) and second period 31 July -18 August (Private International Law). The coming six weeks, the library will serve as the Academy’s ‘home library’, providing the students with access to all books, articles, essays and documentation on international law available in either paper or electronic format. In this Library special, we present you all relevant information. Our July and August Newsletters will be entirely devoted to the coming summer courses, so stay tuned!

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  • Kosovo Specialist Chambers & Specialist Prosecutor’s Office

    June 14, 2017

    The ‘Kosovo Specialist Chambers & Specialist Prosecutor’s Office’ are tasked with the prosecution of individuals for crimes against humanity, war crimes and other crimes under Kosovo law which occurred between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2000 in Kosovo.

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    Women’s Rights and Gender Equality

    March 3, 2017

    Women’s rights are the fundamental human rights that were enshrined by the United Nations for every human being on the planet nearly 70 years ago. These rights include the right to live free from violence, slavery, and discrimination; to be educated; to own property; to vote; and to earn a fair and equal wage. Gender equality is achieved when women and men enjoy the same rights and opportunities across all sectors of society, including economic participation and decision-making, and when the different behaviours, aspirations and needs of women and men are equally valued and favoured.

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  • Tsar Nicholas II: Peace and International Jurisdiction

    February 23, 2017

    The initiative of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia to organize an international peace conference at the dawn of the twentieth century came at exactly the right moment. During the First Hague Peace Conference of 1899, 26 countries came together to speak about disarmament and about the possibility of international jurisdiction, which led to the establishment of the Permanent Court of Arbitration. In 1907 a second peace conference was organized in The Hague, in which 44 countries participated. Find out more about the Tsar’s initiative and his relationship with the Peace Palace.

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  • Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919)

    February 15, 2017

    Andrew Carnegie’s quest for peace led to the founding of a wide range of funds and trusts. Shortly after the 1899 Hague Peace Conference had ended, William T. Stead, a British journalist and pacifist, and Andrew D. White, an American diplomat, convinced the Scottish-born American steel magnate and philanthropist to finance the ‘Temple for Peace’ that was to become the Peace Palace in The Hague. We have created a Library special on Andrew Carnegie in order to provide you easy access to our collection.

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  • Bertha von Suttner (1843-1914)

    February 15, 2017

    Bertha Sophia Felicita von Suttner was a 19th century author and peace activist from Austria. Her most famous work, the anti-war novel titled ‘Die Waffen Nieder’ (Lay Down Your Arms), became an international bestseller and was published in all the major world languages of the time. Upon the success of her novel, Bertha von Suttner quickly rose to prominence within the international peace movement that was gaining ground in Europe and in the United States of America. She founded the Austrian Peace Society, contributed to the establishment of many other pacifist organizations throughout Europe and founded a peace journal, Die Waffen Nieder, which was later succeeded by the journal Die Friedens-Warte.

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  • Syria Crisis: Humanitarian Law, Warfare, Refugees

    October 13, 2016

    The Syrian civil war is an ongoing multi-sided armed conflict in Syria in which international interventions have taken place. The war grew out of the unrest of the 2011 Arab Spring and escalated to armed conflict after President Bashar al-Assad’s government violently repressed protests calling for his removal. Violence in Syria has escalated amid an absence of meaningful efforts to end the war. A confidential list of individuals and units are believed to be responsible for crimes against humanity, breaches of international humanitarian law and gross human rights violations. We have created a Library Special on the Syrian civil war in order to provide you easy access to our collection. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask the librarian: r.steenhard@ppl.nl

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