Library Specials

  • Refugee Crisis in Europe

    janvier 12, 2016

    As migration and refugee movements to Europe have gained unprecedented momentum last year and continue to dominate the news, we have created a Library Special on this topic in order to provide you easy access to our collection: a selective bibliography, newsletters, books, articles and online resources.

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  • Picture: the archives of the International Military Tribunal on their way to the International Court of Justice, arriving at the Peace Palace, 14 March 1950.

    The Nuremberg Trials Legacy

    novembre 6, 2015

    The Nuremberg Trials mark an important moment in the history of international law. Individual war criminals, prominent members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi-Germany, were held responsible and indicted for war crimes and crimes against humanity and brought to justice before an international tribunal. The Nuremberg Trials provided a legal framework on which thereafter prosecution of international crimes was built and thus laid the foundation for international criminal law to emerge as a modern discipline.

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  • Scheldt River: Controversy, Cooperation, International Law | Library Special

    Scheldt River: Controversy, Cooperation, International Law

    septembre 1, 2015

    The Scheldt is a transboundary river which originates in France and runs through Belgium and The Netherlands. The Scheldt Estuary is shared between Belgium and the Netherlands. The Dutch section of the estuary is called the Western Scheldt, and is of vital importance as navigation channel to the port of Antwerp. Since the separation of Belgium from the Netherlands in 1839, the free navigation of the Scheldt and the maintenance and improvement of the navigation channel have been a bone of contention and legal controversy.

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  • Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919)

    février 15, 2015

    Andrew Carnegie’s quest for peace led to the founding of a wide range of funds and trusts. Shortly after the 1899 Hague Peace Conference had ended, William T. Stead, a British journalist and pacifist, and Andrew D. White, an American diplomat, convinced the Scottish-born American steel magnate and philanthropist to finance the ‘Temple for Peace’ that was to become the Peace Palace in The Hague. We have created this Research guide on Andrew Carnegie in order to provide you easy access to our collection.

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  • Bertha von Suttner (1843-1914)

    février 15, 2015

    Bertha von Suttner was a 19th century author, peace activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate from Austria. Her most famous work, the anti-war novel titled ‘Die Waffen Nieder’, became an international bestseller. Upon the success of her novel, Von Suttner quickly rose to prominence within the international peace movement that was gaining ground in Europe and in the United States of America. She also played a significant role in helping the Peace Palace come in to existence.

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  • The Martens Clause

    août 31, 2014

    Friedrich Fromhold Martens was a diplomat and jurist in service of the Russian Empire who made important contributions to the science of international law. He represented Russia at the Hague Peace Conference of 1899, during which he drafted the so-called Martens Clause. This clause has been incorporated into the laws of war. F.F. Martens also helped to settle the first cases of international arbitration. We have created a Library special on this topic in order to provide you easy access to our collection.

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  • World War II

    avril 6, 2014

    World War II was the global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving two opposing military alliances, the Allies and the Axis. It was the most widespread war in history. In a state of “total war,” the participants placed their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities at the service of the war effort. Marked by significant events involving the mass death of civilians, including the Holocaust and the only use of nuclear weapons in warfare, it was the deadliest conflict in human history.

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  • World War I

    avril 6, 2014

    World War I, or the Great War, was a global war, centred in Europe, that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. It involved all of the world’s great powers, which were assembled in two opposing alliances, the Allies the Central Powers. Ultimately, more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, were mobilised in one of the largest wars in history. The outcome of the war subsequently paved the way for various political changes, such as revolutions in many of the nations involved.

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  • Tsar Nicholas II: Peace and International Jurisdiction

    février 23, 2014

    The initiative of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia to organize an international peace conference at the dawn of the 20th century came at exactly the right moment. During the First Hague Peace Conference of 1899, 26 countries came together to speak about disarmament and about the possibility of international jurisdiction, which led to the establishment of the Permanent Court of Arbitration. In 1907 a second peace conference was organized in The Hague. Find out more about the Tsar’s initiative and his relationship with the Peace Palace.

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