Environment

Introduction

International Environmental Law - Research Guide International Law

The main and very important issue at this moment in the environment is climate change. Countries have recognized that climate change presents an ever growing threat to development, poverty eradication efforts, security and the welfare of their citizens. The impact of climate change is already being felt on every continent. Many political and military leaders around the world are now calling climate change the most serious threat to national security in the 21st century. Climate change has been called "perhaps the world's most fearsome weapon of mass destruction". Experts and leaders everywhere agree that climate change has a multiplier effect increasing the impact of other existing threats. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the world’s greenhouse gas emissions are continuing to increase and on the present path, global temperature rise will far exceed the goal to limit of two degrees Celsius that countries have agreed upon to avoid the most dangerous effects of climate change. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon hosted the Climate Summit in September 2014. This Summit was attended by representatives of governments, business and civil society, resulting in a series of climate initiatives. In December 2014, in Lima, Peru, countries moved to advance the negotiations further under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. At present, countries are discussing the legal nature of the agreement, the nature of the responsibilities and actions that each country will undertake, and mechanisms to review progress and to scale up action in the years ahead. From 30 November to 12 December, Paris hosted the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 21) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the 11th session of the meeting of the parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 11). On 12 December, the parties reached a new global agreement on climate change. The agreement presents a balanced outcome with an action plan to limit global warming 'well below' 2°C.
The main elements of the new Paris agreement:
- long-term goal: governments agreed to keep the increase in global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5°C
contributions: before and during the Paris conference countries submitted comprehensive national climate action plans to reduce their emissions
- ambition: governments agreed to communicate every 5 years their contributions to set more ambitious targets
- transparency: they also accepted to report to each other and the public on how well they are doing to implement their targets, to ensure transparency and oversight
- solidarity: the EU and other developed countries will continue to provide climate finance to assist developing countries both to reduce emissions and build resilience to climate change impacts.

Climate summit Paris 2015

Environmental Law is a complex body of law made up of global, international, national, state and local statutes, treaties, conventions, regulations and policies which seek to protect the environment and natural resources affected, impacted or endangered by human activities.

This Research Guide is intended as a starting point for research in the field of International Environmental Law. It provides the basic legal materials available in the Peace Palace Library, both in print and electronic format. Handbooks, leading articles, bibliographies, periodicals, serial publications and documents of interest are presented in the Selective Bibliography section. Links to the PPL Catalogue are inserted. The Library's classification index code 160p. Environmental Questions and subject heading (keyword) International Environmental Law are instrumental for searching through the Catalogue. Special attention is given to our subscriptions on databases, e-journals, e-books and other electronic resources. Finally, this Research Guide features links to relevant websites and other online resources of particular interest.

New titles


1. La notion de diversité biologique en droit international
La notion de diversité biologique en droit international / par Isabelle Michallet. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 75-95 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 75-95. - 2016
Keywords: Biodiversity, International environmental law, Environmental protection, Global governance,

2. La Convention de Rio sur la diversité biologique
La Convention de Rio sur la diversité biologique / par Sandrine Maljean-Dubois. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 97-118 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 97-118. - 2016
Keywords: Biodiversity, International environmental law, Environmental protection, Global governance, Convention on Biological Diversity (Rio de Janeiro, 5 June 1992),

3. Droit du commerce international et biodiversité après le Protocole de Nagoya
Droit du commerce international et biodiversité après le Protocole de Nagoya / par Riccardo Pavoni. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 119-154 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 119-154. - 2016
Keywords: Biodiversity, International environmental law, Environmental protection, International trade, Global governance, Protocols,

4. Savoirs traditionnels et biodiversité
Savoirs traditionnels et biodiversité : de l'enchevêtrement des enjeux aux aménagements du droit / par Geoffroy Filoche. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 155-173 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 155-173. - 2016
Keywords: Indigenous peoples, Traditional knowledge, Biodiversity, Global governance,

5. Partager et conserver la diversité botanique
Partager et conserver la diversité botanique / par Pierre-André Loizeau. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 175-185 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 175-185. - 2016
Keywords: Biodiversity, International environmental law, Environmental protection, Global governance,

6. Implementing the "Data Revolution" for the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals
Implementing the "Data Revolution" for the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals : Toward a Global Administrative Law of Information / Michael Riegner In: The World Bank Legal Review: vol. 7, page 17-39. - 2016
Keywords: Sustainable development, Implementation, Information, International administrative law,

7. Human Rights and the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals
Human Rights and the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals : Reflections on Challenges and Opportunities / Siobhán McInerney-Lankford and Hans-Otto Sano In: The World Bank Legal Review: vol. 7, page 167-183. - 2016
Keywords: Sustainable development, Human rights,

8. Building NESTs to combat environmental crime networks
Building NESTs to combat environmental crime networks / Robin White In: Trends in Organized Crime = ISSN 1936-4830: vol. 19, issue 1, page 88-105. - 2016
Keywords: Asia and the Pacific, Environmental crimes, Environmental security, Organized crime,

9. Understanding the illegal trade of live wildlife species in Peru
Understanding the illegal trade of live wildlife species in Peru / Antony C. Leberatto In: Trends in Organized Crime = ISSN 1936-4830: vol. 19, issue 1, page 42-66. - 2016
Keywords: Peru, Wildlife, Trade, Illegal activities, Environmental protection, Criminology,

Bibliography

Reference works

Books and articles

Documents

Periodicals, serial publications

Bibliographies

New titles


1. La notion de diversité biologique en droit international
La notion de diversité biologique en droit international / par Isabelle Michallet. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 75-95 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 75-95. - 2016
Keywords: Biodiversity, International environmental law, Environmental protection, Global governance,

2. La Convention de Rio sur la diversité biologique
La Convention de Rio sur la diversité biologique / par Sandrine Maljean-Dubois. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 97-118 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 97-118. - 2016
Keywords: Biodiversity, International environmental law, Environmental protection, Global governance, Convention on Biological Diversity (Rio de Janeiro, 5 June 1992),

3. Droit du commerce international et biodiversité après le Protocole de Nagoya
Droit du commerce international et biodiversité après le Protocole de Nagoya / par Riccardo Pavoni. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 119-154 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 119-154. - 2016
Keywords: Biodiversity, International environmental law, Environmental protection, International trade, Global governance, Protocols,

4. Savoirs traditionnels et biodiversité
Savoirs traditionnels et biodiversité : de l'enchevêtrement des enjeux aux aménagements du droit / par Geoffroy Filoche. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 155-173 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 155-173. - 2016
Keywords: Indigenous peoples, Traditional knowledge, Biodiversity, Global governance,

5. Partager et conserver la diversité botanique
Partager et conserver la diversité botanique / par Pierre-André Loizeau. - Bruxelles : Bruylant. - Pages 175-185 In: La diversité dans la gouvernance internationale : perspectives culturelles, écologiques et juridiques / sous la direction de Vincent Négri, ISBN 9782802746539: (2016), Pages 175-185. - 2016
Keywords: Biodiversity, International environmental law, Environmental protection, Global governance,

6. Implementing the "Data Revolution" for the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals
Implementing the "Data Revolution" for the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals : Toward a Global Administrative Law of Information / Michael Riegner In: The World Bank Legal Review: vol. 7, page 17-39. - 2016
Keywords: Sustainable development, Implementation, Information, International administrative law,

7. Human Rights and the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals
Human Rights and the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals : Reflections on Challenges and Opportunities / Siobhán McInerney-Lankford and Hans-Otto Sano In: The World Bank Legal Review: vol. 7, page 167-183. - 2016
Keywords: Sustainable development, Human rights,

8. Building NESTs to combat environmental crime networks
Building NESTs to combat environmental crime networks / Robin White In: Trends in Organized Crime = ISSN 1936-4830: vol. 19, issue 1, page 88-105. - 2016
Keywords: Asia and the Pacific, Environmental crimes, Environmental security, Organized crime,

9. Understanding the illegal trade of live wildlife species in Peru
Understanding the illegal trade of live wildlife species in Peru / Antony C. Leberatto In: Trends in Organized Crime = ISSN 1936-4830: vol. 19, issue 1, page 42-66. - 2016
Keywords: Peru, Wildlife, Trade, Illegal activities, Environmental protection, Criminology,

Librarian's choice

  • Olawuyi, D.S., The Human Rights-based Approach to Carbon Finance, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Cambridge University Press, 2016.

    Olawuyi, D.S., The Human Rights-based Approach to Carbon Finance, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Cambridge University Press, 2016.

    This book analyses the topical and contentious issue of the human rights impacts associated with carbon projects, especially in developing countries. It outlines a human rights-based approach to carbon finance as a functional framework for mainstreaming human rights into the design, approval, finance and implementation of carbon projects. It also describes the nature and scope of carbon projects, the available legal options for their financing and the key human rights issues at stake in their planning and execution. Written in a user-friendly style, the proposal for a rights-based due diligence framework through which human rights issues can be anticipated and addressed makes this book relevant to all stakeholders in carbon, energy, and environmental investments and projects.

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  • Ahmad, T., Climate Change Governance in International Civil Aviation: toward regulating Emissions relevant to Climate Change and Global Warming, The Hague, Eleven International Publishing, 2016.

    Ahmad, T., Climate Change Governance in International Civil Aviation: toward regulating Emissions relevant to Climate Change and Global Warming, The Hague, Eleven International Publishing, 2016.

    Successful climate change governance in international civil aviation has yet to be achieved. In this book the author argues that, to successfully govern emissions from international civil aviation of relevance to climate change and global warming, binding legal measures, whether de facto or de jure, and a mandatory but temporary global market-based measure or unilateral market-based measures of the same model adopted by economically powerful States for international civil aviation are immediately required. This book demonstrates how de jure soft law instruments, e.g., Annexes to the Chicago Convention, international environmental law principles, a new understanding and way of exercising the doctrine of State sovereignty, and both multilateral and unilateral economic instruments can be utilized to reduce aviation’s environmental impacts.

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  • Christiansen, S.M., Climate Conflicts - a Case of International Environmental and Humanitarian Law, Cham, Springer, 2016. (e-book)

    Christiansen, S.M., Climate Conflicts - a Case of International Environmental and Humanitarian Law, Cham, Springer, 2016.

    The book addresses the question of whether the currently available instruments of international environmental and international humanitarian law are applicable to climate conflicts. It clarifies the different pathways leading from climate change to conflict and offers an analysis of international environmental law embedded within the international doctrine of state responsibility. It goes on to discuss whether climate change amounts to an issue covered by Art. 2.4 UN Charter – the prohibition of the use of force. It then considers the possible application of international humanitarian law to climate conflicts. The book also offers a definition of the term “climate conflict”, drawing on legal as well as peace and conflict studies.

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  • Gouritin, A., EU Environmental Law, International Environmental Law, and Human Rights Law : the Case of Environmental Responsibility, Leiden, Boston, Brill, Nijhoff, 2016. (e-book)

    Gouritin, A., EU environmental law, international environmental law, and human rights law : the case of environmental responsibility, Leiden, Boston, Brill, Nijhoff, 2016. (e-book)

    In EU Environmental Law, International Environmental Law, and Human Rights Law: The Case of Environmental Responsibility, Armelle Gouritin offers a critical appraisal of EU environmental responsibility law and asserts a new rights-based approach to international environmental law. This book addresses environmental damage, environmental harm, the grounds for environmental responsibility and the exceptions to the responsibility principle. A critical appraisal of EU Directives 2004/35 and 2008/99 is complemented by an analysis of the input of the European Court on Human Rights and international environmental law with a view to filling the gaps identified in the Directives. Gouritin offers a full analysis of the potential and limits of the rights-based approach applied to environmental responsibility.

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  • Rosenow-Williams, K., Organizational Perspectives on Environmental Migration, London, New York, Earthscan from Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016.

    Rosenow-Williams, K., Organizational Perspectives on Environmental Migration, London, New York, Earthscan from Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016.

    Over the past decade, international organizations (IOs) and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have increasingly focused their efforts on the plight of environmental migrants in both industrialized and developing countries. However, to date very few studies have analysed the influence and rhetoric of advocacy groups in the debates on environmental migration.Organizational Perspectives on Environmental Migration fills this lacuna by drawing together and examining the related themes of climate change and environmental degradation, migration and organizational studies to provide a fresh perspective on their increasing relevance. In order to assess the role of IOs and NGOs in the environmental migration discourse and to understand their interaction and their ways of addressing the topic, the book contains a wide-range of contributions covering the perspectives of organizational sociologists, political scientists, anthropologists, geographers, lawyers and practitioners. The chapters are organized thematically around the perspectives of key actors in the area of environmental migration, including IOs, courts and advocacy groups. The geographically diverse and interdisciplinary range of contributions makes this volume an essential foundational text for organizational responses to environmental migration.This volume will be of great interest to students and scholars of migration studies, international relations, organizational sociology, refugee law and policy, and development studies.

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  • Romanin Jacur, F., Natural Resources Grabbing : an International Law Perspective, Leiden, Boston, Brill Nijhoff, 2016.

    Romanin Jacur, F., Natural Resources Grabbing : an International Law Perspective, Leiden, Boston, Brill Nijhoff, 2016.

    The growing demand for natural resources has triggered a “race” to their exploitation and possession, especially in developing countries. Most desired are water, land, forests, raw materials (oil, gas, mineral and precious stones), fisheries and genetic resources. Emerging economies, Western states, multinational corporations and international financial institutions have become the biggest “buyers” in a race that on one hand strengthens economies and creates investment opportunities and on the other threatens local communities and environmental protection. Natural Resources Grabbing: An International Law Perspective aims at filling a gap in the legal literature by addressing the adverse effects that large-scale investments in natural resources may pose to fundamental human rights and the protection of the environment.

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  • Atapattu, S., Human Rights Approaches to Climate Change : Challenges and Opportunities, Abingdon, Oxon, New York, NY, Routledge, 2016.

    Atapattu, S., Human Rights Approaches to Climate Change : Challenges and Opportunities, Abingdon, Oxon, New York, NY, Routledge, 2016.

    Despite the clear link between climate change and human rights with the potential for virtually all protected rights to be undermined as a result of climate change, its catastrophic impact on human beings was not really understood as a human rights issue until recently. This book examines the link between climate change and human rights in a comprehensive manner. It looks at human rights approaches to climate change, including the jurisprudential bases for human rights and the environment, the theoretical framework governing human rights and the environment, and the different approaches to this including benchmarks. In addition to a discussion of human rights implications of international environmental law principles in the climate change regime, the book explores how the human rights framework can be used in relation to mitigation, adaption, and adjudication. Other chapters examine how vulnerable groups -women, indigenous peoples and climate "refugees" - would be disproportionately affected by climate change. The book then goes on to discuss a new category of people created by climate change, those who will be rendered stateless as a result of states disappearing and displaced by climate change, and whether human rights law can adequately address these emerging issues.

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  • Quirico, O., Climate Change and Human Rights : an International and Comparative Law Perspective, London, New York, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Croup, 2016.

    Quirico, O., Climate Change and Human Rights : an International and Comparative Law Perspective, London, New York, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Croup, 2016.

    Do anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions affect human rights? Should fundamental rights constrain climate policies? Scientific evidence demonstrates that anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions contribute to increasing atmospheric temperatures, soon passing the compromising threshold of 2° C. Consequences such as Typhoon Haiyan prove that climate alteration has the potential to significantly impair basic human needs. Although the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and human rights regulatory regimes have so far proceeded separately, awareness is arising about their reciprocal implications. Based on tripartite fundamental obligations, this volume explores the relationship between climate change and interdependent human rights, through the lens of an international and comparative perspective. Along the lines of the metaphor of the ‘wall’, the research ultimately investigates the possibility of overcoming the divide between universal rights and climate change, and underlying barriers. This book aims to be a useful resource not only for practitioners, policymakers, academics, and students in international, comparative, environmental law and politics and human rights, but also for the wider public.

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Database

Blogs

  • Marrakech Climate Change Conference 2016

    The 22nd Session of the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP22) is being held in Marrakech, from November 7 to 18, 2016. This international climate conference will focus on action items in order to achieve the priorities of the Paris Agreement, especially related to adaptation, transparency, technology transfer, mitigation, capacity building and loss and damages. Signatories to The Paris Agreement now have to develop their National Adaptation Plans.

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  • Paris Global Climate Agreement: Toward Entry into Force

    On 21 September 2016, a special event will take place. United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has invited leaders from all countries to the UN Headquarters in New York from 8:00-9:00am to attend this event and to deposit their instruments of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession to the Paris Climate Agreement on climate change. The event will provide an opportunity to countries to publicly commit to joining or ratifying the agreement before the end of 2016. It is expected that the September event will help efforts to secure early entry into force of the Paris Agreement.

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  • Vessel-Source Air Pollution Remains Global 'Blindspot'

    Shipping is considered to be a significant source of global air pollution, both for conventional pollutants and greenhouse gases. Sulphur and black carbon, also called soot, are released in the air in large quantities because large (container and cruise) ships use heavy bunker oil. This is oil from the waste well of the oil industry, the cheapest and dirtiest thing you can get. Seventeen containerships emit as much sulfur as all the cars on the planet in one year. And one cruise ship emits a day as much soot as one million cars.

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  • 30 Years After Chernobyl - Nuclear Safety and Security

    The Chernobyl nuclear tragedy had a tremendous impact on the global community. This nuclear disaster has changed the attitude of nations to nuclear safety. After the nuclear accident, new standards and strategies for improving nuclear and radiation safety, emergency response and disaster mitigation have been developed. Since the Chernobyl accident the International Atomic Energy Association has adopted many security related legal instruments have been adopted to increase nuclear safety and security on a global and domestic level.

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  • Royal Sperm Whales and More

    Has any mammal inspired such romantic images of the sea and love for nature as much as the whale, yet aroused such controversy in global environmental conservation? Legal efforts to protect whales, however, extend beyond whaling issues. Even beyond protection itself. What about legal arrangements dealing with such large marine mammals found stranded on the shoreline? This so-called phenomenon of Cetacean stranding certainly is something that arouses public interest and emotion.

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  • Coral Reefs under Threat?

    Are coral reefs condemned to disappear? During the first decade of the 21st century, the intensification of cyclones, the phenomenon of coral bleaching due to ocean warming, outbreaks of a coral-eating starfish and coral diseases left us with this fear. In terms of addressing knowledge gaps, coral reefs are a priority because of their extraordinarily high biological richness and the multitude of products and ecosystem services they provide to human beings. What is the status and legal regime of coral reefs nowadays?

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  • Investigating Foreign Political Links in Timber-Producing Countries

    At the time of writing, it is the International Day of Forests. It is on this day, 21st March 2016, that Project LEAF (Law Enforcement Assistance for Forests) of INTERPOL spoke out (again) about the link between corruption and the global trade in timber. An estimated $30 billion of government revenue is lost every year as a result of corruption in timber trade. This article will shed light on the indiscriminate destruction of our forests, under the guise of economic development for the financial benefit of elites at the highest level of the political system and how international, regional and national laws on anti-­corruption are implicated.

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  • Save Wildlife: Act Now or Game Over!

    From 1-3 March 2016, 300 Representatives from Countries, Intergovernmental organisations, non-governmental organisations, business representatives and the broader civil society were gathered in The Hague, the Netherlands for the international wildlife conference: Save Wildlife: Act now or Game over. The conference was organized by the Ministry of Economic Affairs of the Netherlands, the Hague Institute for Global Justice and the Prince of Wales’s International Sustainability Unit. The conference has build on the London and Kasane Conferences on the illegal wildlife trade, and has set the stage for the Hanoi Conference, due to take place later in 2016.

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  • South-Africa and the Future of (Il)legal Trade in Rhino Horn

    On Sunday 22 November, zookeepers of the San Diego Zoo Safari Park put a 41-year old northern white rhinoceros named Nola to sleep. With the death of Nola, there are only three northern white rhinos left on the planet – which are unlikely to reproduce. Widespread poaching, as well as armed conflict, caused the extinction of northern white rhinos in the wild. Last Thursday, the High Court of Pretoria, South Africa, overturned the government’s ban on the domestic trade in rhino horn which was put in place in 2009.

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  • Climate Change and Planetary Security

    On 2 and 3 November 2015, experts of the Hague Centre of Strategic Studies attended in the international conference on “Planetary Security: Peace and Cooperation in Times of Climate Change and Global Environmental Challenges” at the Peace Palace in The Hague. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands organized this Planetary Security Initiative. The Netherlands aims to facilitate events on an annual basis and like to provide a regular time and place where experts, organizations, and decision makers could assemble, share, connect and strengthen their parts of the new strategies needed for the future of planetary security.

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  • The Impact of Offshore Oil Drilling in the Arctic

    In July 2015 the Obama administration has given Royal Dutch Shell PLC approval to begin with limited exploratory oil drilling off Alaska’s northwest coast, in the Chukchi Sea. The permits were granted despite the nationwide protest (where people in 13 states gathered for a “ShellNo” Day of Action) and protests by many environmental organizations such as Greenpeace, the Natural Resources Defense Council and Friends of the Earth. In this blog I will give a summary of the history of Arctic drilling and I will also discuss shortly the environmental concerns and technological and safety risks relating to offshore oil drilling in the Arctic.

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  • A Green Court in The Netherlands: Stichting Urgenda v. The Netherlands

    On the 24th of June 2015, the civil section of the Dutch court of The Hague, the Netherlands, ordered the Dutch government to adjust its environmental policies in order to reduce the collective greenhouse emissions of the Netherlands by 25% compared to 1990 by the end of 2020. News of this unusual judgment spread across the globe as it was the first time that a court ordered a government to step up its game on climate change. This post will provide readers with a summary of the judgment, as well as some thoughts on its merits.

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  • "All Animals Are Equal, But Some Are More Equal Than Others": Animal Protection and Animal Welfare Legislation Compared

    Animals are treated in an ambivalent way. On the one hand humans cuddle, love and pamper the animals they keep. On the other hand many animals are being a victim of some kind of abuse. Not all animals are equally protected against animal cruelty. It differs per country and it depends on the status of different kinds of animals. Dogs which are used in research or for food are not equally protected from inhumane treatment as companion dogs are. The way how animals are treated is also dependent on cultural norms and beliefs.

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  • Paardenmarkt: A Toxic Legacy of the Great War

    Countries that in the past have chosen to take the easy way out by disposing their chemical warfare material by ocean dumping are now realizing the unpleasant fact that this material, although out of sight, is not out of mind because it presents threats to public health and the environment. Here, the example of one of the largest World War I ammunition dump sites in Europe, the Paardenmarkt, a narrow submerged sand-bank called off the coast of Belgium.

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  • International Wildlife Law and the Problem of Illegal Trade

    The hunt for endangered species and protected wildlife has been on the rise for the last decade and has recently become a global crisis. Many wildlife species are currently on the brink of extinction, especially on the African continent. In large part, this is mostly due to practices of illegal hunting and poaching for purposes of illegal wildlife trade. This blog will briefly discuss this issue as well as recent efforts of the international community to combat international wildlife trade.

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  • Tuvalu, Quo Vadis?

    Climate change damage in the South Pacific is a problem for all small island developing states, including Tuvalu. These island states may become uninhabitable within the foreseeable future. What about the maritime boundaries and maritime claims of the former (Tuvalu) sea territory, which options do Tuvaluans have here? Does a disappearing Tuvalu have international repercussions? Tuvalu (formerly the Ellice Islands) comprises a cluster of nine islands, plus islets, located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean just south of the Equator. These remote atolls are situated about 1,050 km (650 mi) n of Suva, Fiji, and 4,000 km (2,500 mi) of Sydney, Australia. Tuvalu has a coastline of 24 km (15 mi). As a rather small archipel Tuvale possesses considerable maritime claims on fishing grounds and natural resources in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and continental shelf.

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  • Ivory Traffickers! How Inventive Can You Get?

    During an inspection of the luggage of two South Africans last month, officials in Chinese-ruled Macau found 15 suspiciously heavy boxes of chocolate. The boxes appeared to be pieces of elephant tusks with an estimated market value of more than $76,000 U.S. dollars. Apparently ivory smugglers are getting more inventive.

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  • Shell and Ogoni People : (s)oil pollution in the Niger Delta

    On January 30, 2013, the court (Rechtbank) in the Hague, The Netherlands, ruled that Royal Dutch Shell can be held partially responsible for pollution in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region and ordered it to pay damages to one farmer. The Dutch court dismissed four out of five allegations of the Ogoni people against the oil company. Although Shell blames the oil pollution to sabotage, activists say the case could set a precedent for damage claims related to the foreign activities of multinational companies.

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  • The Institute for Environmental Security

    Promoting security, peace and justice for man and nature by preventing environmental degradation and by restoring environmental damage where done, defines the programme of the Institute for Environmental Security (IES).

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  • From Stockholm to Rio de Janeiro; the road to a sustainable world!

    Forty years after the Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment and twenty years after the first “Earth Summit” held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992, the world community will meet again. This time at the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD), in short Rio+20: “the future we want”.

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  • Fighting the Architecture of Death

    Nowadays nature is threatened by all kinds of dangers which usually have one common denominator: they are caused by humans. Everyday human activity is affecting wildlife in many ways, such as habitat destruction, the use of pesticides, monoculture, genetically manipulated organisms and pollution, which is driving many species towards extinction. For birds, habitat loss is the most important factor closely followed by threats posed by materials used to build in the construction industry. The trend among architects is to use plate glass in building, purely for aesthetic reasons.

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  • Keeping Your Head Above Water: The Pacific Islands & The Rising Tide Of International Climate Litigation

    On February 3rd, Johnson Toribiong, the President of the Pacific Island Nation Palau, announced that his country will seek an Advisory Opinion from the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague regarding the issue of climate change. This blog will briefly discuss the measures that states in these circumstances can invoke during a court procedure.

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  • Plastic Soup – What Legal Response to Marine Debris Pollution ?

    Solving the problem of marine debris and plastic pollution in the World’s oceans is a very complex and challenging enterprise. In particular, its legal framework. Various international and regional instruments, domestic and local laws and regulations apply directly or indirectly to marine debris pollution. The conspicuously global nature of this problem indicates that a potential role of significance is reserved for international environmental law. However, not all international and regional instruments are legally binding, and not all have a strong focus on marine debris and plastic pollution.

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  • Bees under Bombardment : Time for Plan Bee

    Current scientific evidence demonstrates that a sixth major extinction of biological diversity event is underway. The Earth is losing between one and ten percent of biodiversity per decade, mostly due to habitat loss, pest invasion, pollution, climate change, over-harvesting and disease. Certain natural ecosystem services, which are vital for human societies, are under stress.

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