Intervention

Introduction

Intervention - Research Guide International Law

Article 2 under 7 of the Charter of the United Nations is clear in case a recognised state is subject to an intervention: "Nothing contained in the present Charter shall authorize the United Nations to intervene in matters which are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any state". This article contains a codification of the territorial integrity of a State principle. Under the Responsibility to Protect doctrine, rather than having a right to intervene in the conduct of other states, states are said to have a responsibility to intervene and protect the citizens of another state where that other state has failed in its obligation to protect its own citizens against international crimes or natural disasters. Responsibility to Protect is the name of a report produced in 2001 by the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (ICISS) which was established by the Canadian government in response to the history of unsatisfactory humanitarian interventions. The report sought to establish a set of clear guidelines for determining when intervention is appropriate, what the appropriate channels for approving an intervention are and how the intervention itself should be carried out. It argues that the notion of a 'right to intervene' is problematic and should be replaced with the 'responsibility to protect'.

This Research Guide is intended as a starting point for research on Intervention. It provides the basic legal materials available in the Peace Palace Library, both in print and electronic format. Handbooks, leading articles, bibliographies, periodicals, serial publications and documents of interest are presented in the Selective Bibliography section. Links to the PPL Catalogue are inserted. The Library's classification index code 59. Intervention and Non-Intervention and subject heading (keyword) Intervention and Non-Intervention are instrumental for searching through the Catalogue. Special attention is given to our subscriptions on databases, e-journals, e-books and other electronic resources. Finally, this Research Guide features links to relevant websites and other online resources of particular interest.

New titles


1. Maintaining peace and security?
Maintaining peace and security? : the United Nations in a changing world / Trudy Fraser. - London : Macmillan Education, Palgrave, 2015. - XXI, 266 pages. ; 24 cm Includes bibliographical references and index. - 2015
Keywords: Security Council, United Nations, International peace and security, Peacekeeping, Sovereignty, Intervention, Reform, Human rights, Development, Human security,

2. Revisiting the Right of Self-Defence against Non-State Armed Entities
Revisiting the Right of Self-Defence against Non-State Armed Entities / I.M. Lobo de Souza In: The Canadian Yearbook of International Law = ISSN 0069-0058: vol. 53 (2015), page 202-243. - 2015
Keywords: Jus ad bellum, Use of force, Self-defence, Armed conflicts, Aggression, Non-State actors, Intervention,

3. Contested Intervention: China, India, and the Responsibility to Protect
Contested Intervention: China, India, and the Responsibility to Protect / Tim Dunne, Sarah Teitt In: Global Governance = ISSN 1075-2846: vol. 21, issue 3, page 371-392. - 2015
Keywords: China, India, Security Council, Responsibility to protect, Intervention, International relations,

Bibliography

Reference works

Books

Leading articles

Documents

 Periodicals and Serial Publications

Bibliographies

New titles


1. Maintaining peace and security?
Maintaining peace and security? : the United Nations in a changing world / Trudy Fraser. - London : Macmillan Education, Palgrave, 2015. - XXI, 266 pages. ; 24 cm Includes bibliographical references and index. - 2015
Keywords: Security Council, United Nations, International peace and security, Peacekeeping, Sovereignty, Intervention, Reform, Human rights, Development, Human security,

2. Revisiting the Right of Self-Defence against Non-State Armed Entities
Revisiting the Right of Self-Defence against Non-State Armed Entities / I.M. Lobo de Souza In: The Canadian Yearbook of International Law = ISSN 0069-0058: vol. 53 (2015), page 202-243. - 2015
Keywords: Jus ad bellum, Use of force, Self-defence, Armed conflicts, Aggression, Non-State actors, Intervention,

3. Contested Intervention: China, India, and the Responsibility to Protect
Contested Intervention: China, India, and the Responsibility to Protect / Tim Dunne, Sarah Teitt In: Global Governance = ISSN 1075-2846: vol. 21, issue 3, page 371-392. - 2015
Keywords: China, India, Security Council, Responsibility to protect, Intervention, International relations,

Librarian's choice

  • Yoo, J., Point of Attack: Preventive War, International Law, and Global Welfare, New York, Oxford University Press, 2014.

    Yoo, J., Point of Attack : Preventive War, International Law, and Global Welfare, New York, Oxford University Press, 2014.

    Point of Attack argues that the time has come to replace the international rules of war. Current law permits nations to resort to force only in self-defense or under UN authority, which perversely allows mass civilian killings, civil wars, weapons proliferation, and terrorism to run rampant. A new approach should allow the great powers to intervene when a war would benefit global welfare more than the costs.

    View this title in our link resolver Plinklet
  • Walling, C.B., All Necessary Measures: the United Nations and Humanitarian Intervention, Philadelphia, PA, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013.

    Walling, C.B., All Necessary Measures: the United Nations and Humanitarian Intervention, Philadelphia, PA, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013.

    What prompts the United Nations Security Council to intervene forcefully in some crises at high risk for genocide and ethnic cleansing but not others? In All Necessary Measures, Carrie Booth Walling identifies several systematic patterns in the stories that council members tell about conflicts and the policy solutions that result from them. Drawing on qualitative comparative case studies spanning two decades, including situations where the council has intervened to stop mass killing (Somalia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Sierra Leone) as well as situations where it has not (Rwanda, Kosovo, and Sudan), Walling posits that the arguments council members make about the cause and character of conflict as well as the source of sovereign authority in target states have the potential to enable or constrain the use of military force in defense of human rights. At a moment when constructivist scholars in international relations are pushing beyond empirical claims for the value of norms toward critical analysis of such norms, All Necessary Measures establishes discourse's real-world explanatory power. From her comparative chronology, Walling demonstrates that humanitarian intervention becomes possible when the majority of Security Council members come to a shared understanding of the conflict, perpetrators, and victims—and probable when the Council understands state sovereignty as complementary to human rights norms. By illuminating the relationship between national interests and the core values of Security Council members and how it influences decision-making, All Necessary Measures suggests when and where the Security Council is likely to intervene in the future.

    View this title in our link resolver Plinklet
  • Hehir, A. and R. Murray (eds.) Libya, The Responsibility to Protect and the Future of Humanitarian Intervention, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

    Hehir, A. and R. Murray (eds.) Libya, The Responsibility to Protect and the Future of Humanitarian Intervention, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

    This book brings together internationally renowned academics from Europe and North America offering a uniquely comprehensive and timely analysis of the intervention in Libya in 2011. The military intervention in Libya in March 2011 generated heated debate internationally and reinvigorated interest in humanitarian intervention. The action was widely heralded as a surprisingly robust and effective response to a looming mass atrocity. This volume critically analyses the intervention and challenges the dominant positive narrative, especially the ostensibly causal role played by the 'Responsiblity to Protect' doctrine (R2P). The contributors assess the Libyan intervention in the context of a number of contemporary trends and ongoing debates and argue that the manner in which the intervention was sanctioned, prosecuted and justified has a number of troubling implications for both the future of humanitarian intervention and international peace and security.

    View this title in our link resolver Plinklet
  • Burke, C., An Equitable Framework for Humanitarian Intervention, Oxford, Hart Publishing, 2013.

    Burke, C., An Equitable Framework for Humanitarian Intervention, Oxford, Hart Publishing, 2013.

    This book aims to resolve the dilemma regarding whether armed intervention as a response to gross human rights violations is ever legally justified without Security Council authorisation. Thus far, international lawyers have been caught between giving a negative answer on the basis of the UN Charter's rules ('positivists'), and a 'turn to ethics', declaring intervention legitimate on moral grounds, while eschewing legal analysis ('moralists'). In this volume, a third solution is proposed. The idea is presented that many equitable principles may qualify as 'general principles of law recognised by civilised nations' - one of the three principal sources of international law (though a category that is often overlooked) - a conclusion based upon detailed research of both national legal systems and international law.

    View this title in our link resolver Plinklet
  • Schmidt, E., Foreign Intervention in Africa: from the Cold War to the War on Terror, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

    Schmidt, E., Foreign Intervention in Africa : from the Cold War to the War on Terror, Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.

    Foreign Intervention in Africa chronicles the foreign political and military interventions in Africa from 1956 to 2010, during the periods of decolonisation and the Cold War, as well as during the periods of state collapse and the 'global war on terror'. In the first two periods, the most significant intervention was extra-continental. The USA, the Soviet Union, China, Cuba and the former colonial powers entangled themselves in countless African conflicts. During the period of state collapse, the most consequential interventions were intra-continental. African governments, sometimes assisted by powers outside the continent, supported warlords, dictators and dissident movements in neighbouring countries and fought for control of their neighbours' resources. The global war on terror, like the Cold War, increased foreign military presence on the African continent and generated external support for repressive governments. In each of these cases, external interests altered the dynamics of Africa's internal struggles, escalating local conflicts into larger conflagrations, with devastating effects on African peoples.

    View this title in our link resolver Plinklet

Database

Blogs

  • Extending the Coalition against Islamic State

    Yesterday, Turkey’s parliament has backed a motion that could allow its military to enter Iraq and Syria to join the campaign against Islamic State (IS) militants. While Arab countries including Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Bahrain and Qatar have quickly joined the bombing campaign, Washington’s traditional Western allies had been slow to answer the call from U.S. President Barack Obama. France was the first Western country to respond, but this week national parliaments in the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark and Australia have approved to join the global coalition against Islamic State too.

    Read more
  • Hague Academy Model United Nations on Drone Warfare and International Law

    Directed energy weapons, drones, self targeting bullets, mobile tactical high energy lasers, military robots, spy weapons, weapons undetectable under an x-ray scan, remote controlled insect armies, self driving tanks, robotic mules, thermal camouflage, surveillance technologies and autonomous unmanned systems are some examples of the high tech weapons and military technology that are now used during warfare. The use of this state of the art military technology raises serious ethical and legal questions: (when) is the use of drones acceptable?

    Read more
  • Interview: Dr. Christian Noack

    This month, our first time guest editor and colleague, Ms. Anna Duszczyk, invited Dr. Christian Noack from the University of Amsterdam, for an in-depth interview on the current crisis in Ukraine. Dr. Noack is an expert on Eastern European History, Media Studies and Slavonic Studies. In this interview, he will discuss his views on the current political situation in Ukraine and the role of Russia and the European Union in the crisis.

    Read more

See also

More Research guides on War, Peace and Security

PPL keywords