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Aerial warfare

  • Air Warfare and International Law: A Bibliographic Overview

    January 4, 2018

    All armed conflicts are covered by the basic rules and principles of the laws of war, wherever the theatre of operations might be, land, sea or air. Although some treaty and customary law specifically refers to certain aspects of aerial warfare, no specific regulation of modern air warfare has yet been adopted. Nevertheless, it is clear that the general principles and rules of international humanitarian law apply. We have created a bibliographic overview on this topic intended as a starting point for your research.

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  • Air Warfare/Bombardments: A Bibliographic Overview

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  • Book Launch: ‘The Barbarization of the Sky’ (1912) in English

    June 27, 2017

    July 4, 2017, 17:00 pm. Historic Reading Room. First complete English translation of Bertha von Suttner’s ‘Die Barbarisierung der Luft’. Please, register at berthavonsuttner.com/launch.

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  • Drones Deployed during War raise Various Legal and Ethical Questions

    April 10, 2015

    Drones can be used for many different purposes. The use of drones raises various legal and ethical questions ranging from humanitarian to privacy issues. The Peace and Security Salon of 9 April discussed these questions in the context of the deployment of armed drones and robots during wartime. Three specialists each discussed the use of drones from a different background.

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  • Deutschlands Schicksal

    Deutschlands Schicksal

    November 13, 2014

    German propaganda poster that expresses Germany’s fear for British bombing of their industrial plants. Image: map of Germany’s main industrial area. Around the map bombers and destroyed industrial plants are depicted.

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  • Dresden 1945

    Dresden 1945: An Allied War Crime?

    February 18, 2011

    Since 1945, the bombing of Dresden is considered by many as a violation of international law and as a crime against humanity, even though positive rules of international humanitarian law were absent at the time. The Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907, were among the first formal statements of the laws of war and war crimes in the nascent body of international law. However these conventions, adressing the codes of wartime conduct on land and at sea, were adopted before the rise of air power. Despite repeated diplomatic attempts (→ The Hague Rules of Air Warefare 1922/1923) to update international humanitarian law to include aerial warfare, it was not done before the outbreak of World War II. The absence of positive international humanitarian law does not mean that the laws of war did not cover aerial warfare, but there was no general agreement of how to interpret those laws. The aerial bombardment of Dresden does not only raise the question as to whether or not it was an Allied war crime, but it also makes a moral appeal to prevent total war against civilian populations. It’s memory is kept alive.

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