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Europe

  • Targeted Killing of European Foreign Terrorist Fighters in Syria and Iraq

    October 25, 2017

    In recent years, a significant number of European nationals have travelled to Syria or Iraq to train and fight with terrorist groups such as the Islamic State (IS). This flow of foreign terrorist fighters (FTFs) has posed serious security concerns for Europe, in particular with regards to the threat posed by FTFs returning to Europe to carry out terrorist attacks. In this context, it appears that a number of States have resorted to targeted strikes against their citizens in Syria and Iraq.

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  • Are Syria and Iraq the Middle Eastern Bloodlands?

    July 20, 2017

    Deir az-Zor is a sleepy town on the banks of the Euphrates in the Syrian desert, and did not ring much of a bell for most non-Syrians. Except for Armenians. During the 1915 Armenian Genocide, the Ottoman government deported hundreds of thousands of Ottoman Armenians to Deir az-Zor, where they were left to die or were killed outright. A German diplomat who was stationed in that area wrote that the Armenians were “slaughtered like sheep”. To the casual observer this looked allegorical or even hyperbolical, in any case unreal, removed far away in geography, time, and culture. Until recent times, when ISIS videos surfaced online. And again the desert soil of Deir az-Zor shone red with blood, and once more the word ‘Deir az-Zor’ served as a symbol of bloodshed.

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  • Battle of Waterloo 1815-2015

    June 17, 2015

    The Battle of Waterloo was fought on Sunday, 18 June 1815, 200 years ago, near Waterloo in present-day Belgium, then part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands. The French army under the command of Napoleon Bonaparte was defeated by the armies of the Seventh Coalition, comprising an Anglo-Dutch-Allied army under the command of the Duke of Wellington combined with a Prussian army under the command of Gebhard von Blücher. Find out more about the Napoleonic wars, the Congress of Vienna and the European balance of power in our collection.
    Battle of Watrerloo 1815-2015

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  • Hull, I.V., A Scrap of Paper: Breaking and Making International Law during the Great War, Ithaca; London, Cornell University Press, 2014.

    Hull, I.V., A Scrap of Paper: Breaking and Making International Law during the Great War, Ithaca; London, Cornell University Press, 2014.

    November 8, 2014

    A century after the outbreak of the Great War, we have forgotten the central role that international law and the dramatically different interpretations of it played in the conflict’s origins and conduct. In A Scrap of Paper, Isabel V. Hull compares wartime decision making in Germany, Great Britain, and France, weighing the impact of legal considerations in each.

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  • Garner, J.W., International Law and the World War, 2 vols., London, Longmans, Green and Co, 1920

    Garner, J.W., International Law and the World War, 2 vols., London, Longmans, Green and Co, 1920

    July 24, 2014

    This monumental contemporary treatise was undertaken by the author, Professor J.W. Garner, at the request of the famous jurist Dr. L. Oppenheim to “review the conduct of the belligerents in respect to their interpretation and application of the rules of international law, compare it with the opinions of the authorities and the practice in former wars and wherever infractions appeared, to endeavor to determine the responsibility and to place it where it properly belonged”.

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  • Phillipson, C., International Law and the Great War, London, Fisher Unwin; Sweet and Maxwell, 1915.

    Phillipson, C., International Law and the Great War, London, Fisher Unwin; Sweet and Maxwell, 1915

    July 1, 2014

    In this contemporary work, Coleman Phillipson, gives a systematic account, from the point of view of international law, of most of the questions and incidents that had risen in the Great War so far. Despite the numerous breaches of international law indicated, the author states that we need not despair of its future.

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  • European Revue: Kill that Eagle, 1914

    European Revue: Kill that Eagle, 1914

    June 30, 2014

    Cartoon map of Europe at the beginning of World War I. The map is showing Austria-Hungary at the centre, depicted as the tragic and buffoonish Pierrot character of European pantomime, who eternally pines for an unrequited love. Is it Germany’s love that Austria pines for? Read more.

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  • Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria

    Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria

    June 27, 2014

    A 100 years ago, on 28 June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were shot dead in Sarajevo. The assassination led to the outbreak of the First World War. The Peace Palace Library will commemorate the First World War with a series of blogs and Centenary items on the website.

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  • Mit Recht für Europa, Fortbildung in Europäische Recht

    Mit Recht für Europa, Fortbildung in Europäische Recht

    August 23, 2013

    Multilingual poster for an education programme at the Academy of European Law Trier with the slogan “The Right to know. Continuing Education in European Law”

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  • European Revue: Kill that Eagle, 1914

    June 12, 2013

    Cartoon map of Europe at the beginning of World War I. The map is showing Austria-Hungary at the centre, depicted as the tragic and buffoonish Pierrot character of European pantomime, who eternally pines for an unrequited love. Is it Germany’s love that Austria pines for? While grasping itself to the German eagle, a brown bear (Russia) lashes out […]

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