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Torture

  • Mali War Crimes Suspect Mr. Al Hassan Makes Initial Appearance Before the ICC

    April 5, 2018

    After the Al Mahdi case, a landmark trial, a second case has been referred to the International Criminal Court (ICC) on charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in Timbuktu, Mali between 2012 and 2013. Another Malian national, 40-year-old Mr Al Hassan Ag Abdoul Aziz Ag Mohamed Ag Mahmoud, faces charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. He has been accused of destroying holy places, mausoleums of Muslim saints in Timbuktu and of enforcing a policy of forced marriage which had led to sexual slavery and rape of women and girls. The alleged crimes were committed between 2012 and 2013 when Timbuktu was under the control of militant islamists. From April 2012 until January 2013, Mr Al Hassan was head of the Islamic Police.

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  • The Case of Albert Woodfox and Solitary Confinement

    February 26, 2016

    Albert Woodfox, an American prisoner who was held in solitary confinement for 43 years was finally released on February 19th, 2016. Albert Woodfox, was part of the ‘Angola Three’, a group of three prisoners who were placed in solitary confinement in the State Penitentiary of Louisiana, also known as the Angola Prison. The case of Albert Woodfox is unique because no other prisoner in US history has been held in solitary confinement for this length of time. This blog will briefly discuss the circumstances of the case of Albert Woodfox and the use of solitary confinement in light of international standards.

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  • War Crimes Investigations in the UK: All is Fair in Law and War?

    January 29, 2016

    While the last British troops left Iraq in 2011, national and international investigations into the UK military’s conduct in Iraq are still ongoing and continue to spark controversy. Civil lawsuits as well as criminal prosecutions could still be on the horizon for some British soldiers. Gerry Simpson described this continuous quest for justice and the backlash against its results as the human dilemma of “wanting justice and being ‘sick of giving it’”. This blog will examine the British involvement in Iraq and the alleged war crimes committed during their mission, and the efforts and initiatives undertaken to discover the truth and to seek justice.

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  • Homeland, Zero Dark Thirty and Jack Bauer: Rendition, Torture and the Demise of American Values

    Homeland, Zero Dark Thirty and Jack Bauer: Rendition, Torture and the Demise of American Values

    March 8, 2013

    The latest in a series of Hollywood productions which reopened a debate about torture and extraordinary rendition is Zero Dark Thirty. Real life variations of Hollywood-scenarios have been unfolding as the US government has engaged in a program of extraordinary rendition since the Clinton Administration and which became widespread under the Bush Administration following the September 11 terrorist attacks.This blog examines Obama’s policy towards torture and (extraordinary) rendition.

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  • Child Soldiers in Congo

    The International Criminal Court Delivers Judgment on Child Soldiers

    March 16, 2012

    On Wednesday 14 March, Trial Chamber I of the International Criminal Court (ICC) delivered it’s first verdict. In a unanimous decision three judges convicted Thomas Lubanga Dyilo of the war crimes of conscripting, enlisting, and using children under the age of 15 to participate actively in hostilities. With this judgment the ICC firmly establishes the use of children in armed conflict as an international crime and also focuses renewed attention on the many thousands of children still used in various other conflicts in the world.

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