RSS

United Kingdom

  • Brexit progress? House of Commons says NO

    March 29, 2019

    Today is the set date in the Withdrawal Agreement with the European Union, the United Kingdom is allowed formally to leave the European Union (Brexit).

    However, the British Parliament (House of Commons) has to give her approval to Theresa May’s deal. The British Prime minister has even offered to resign, if the House of Commons would vote for her deal. Nevertheless, the House of Commons has shown many ‘NO’ ‘s even to options discussed and proposed within the Parliament.

    Read more
  • D'eeuwige gedenck-teekene

    D’eeuwige gedenck-teekene

    September 6, 2013

    Engraving on the Treaty of Breda, signed on 31 July 1667  by England, the United Provinces (Netherlands), France, and Denmark–Norway. This treaty brought an end to the Second Anglo-Dutch War (1665–1667). Image: A group of statesmen are standing behind a table. There are documents on the table with lead seal and a quill pen with an inkwell. The upper part of the engraving depicts […]

    Read more
  • Dresden 1945

    Dresden 1945: An Allied War Crime?

    February 18, 2011

    Since 1945, the bombing of Dresden is considered by many as a violation of international law and as a crime against humanity, even though positive rules of international humanitarian law were absent at the time. The Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907, were among the first formal statements of the laws of war and war crimes in the nascent body of international law. However these conventions, adressing the codes of wartime conduct on land and at sea, were adopted before the rise of air power. Despite repeated diplomatic attempts (→ The Hague Rules of Air Warefare 1922/1923) to update international humanitarian law to include aerial warfare, it was not done before the outbreak of World War II. The absence of positive international humanitarian law does not mean that the laws of war did not cover aerial warfare, but there was no general agreement of how to interpret those laws. The aerial bombardment of Dresden does not only raise the question as to whether or not it was an Allied war crime, but it also makes a moral appeal to prevent total war against civilian populations. It’s memory is kept alive.

    Read more
  • The Falkland Islands Conflict

    March 12, 2010

    Tensions between Argentina and the United Kingdom over the Falkland Islands came to a boiling point when the UK announced plans to begin offshore oil drilling near the remote islands in February 2010. This blog will briefly discuss this complicated dispute as well as the actions taken by both parties in the United Nations General Assembly.

    Read more
  • Messages in Miniature

    September 18, 2009

    Postage stamps were originally used as denotation of the prepayment of postal charges. Back in the 19th century stamps issued usually depicted heads of state, crests or flags and occasionally commemorated an event. In the 1920s this changed, when governments began to realize that postage stamps, by conveying cultural or political messages, could also be […]

    Read more