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World War I

  • Phillipson, C., International Law and the Great War, London, Fisher Unwin; Sweet and Maxwell, 1915.

    Phillipson, C., International Law and the Great War, London, Fisher Unwin; Sweet and Maxwell, 1915

    July 1, 2014

    In this contemporary work, Coleman Phillipson, gives a systematic account, from the point of view of international law, of most of the questions and incidents that had risen in the Great War so far. Despite the numerous breaches of international law indicated, the author states that we need not despair of its future.

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  • European Revue: Kill that Eagle, 1914

    European Revue: Kill that Eagle, 1914

    June 30, 2014

    Cartoon map of Europe at the beginning of World War I. The map is showing Austria-Hungary at the centre, depicted as the tragic and buffoonish Pierrot character of European pantomime, who eternally pines for an unrequited love. Is it Germany’s love that Austria pines for? Read more.

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  • Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria

    Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria

    June 27, 2014

    A 100 years ago, on 28 June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were shot dead in Sarajevo. The assassination led to the outbreak of the First World War. The Peace Palace Library will commemorate the First World War with a series of blogs and Centenary items on the website.

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  • Kaiser Wilhelm II

    A Supreme Offence against International Morality and the Sanctity of Treaties: William II of Hohenzollern and the Treaty of Versailles

    June 27, 2014

    Early during World War I, jurists and statesmen in both France and Great-Britain, such as Larnaude and Lapradelle, had advocated the German Emperor William II to be arrested and brought to trial. The principle that military officers should be held personally responsible for orders in violation of the laws and customs of war, if pushed to its logical limits, would render commanders-in-chief, that is heads of State, liable for illegal acts for which they are responsible, directly or indirectly. And in Germany, there was one commander-in-chief: the Emperor William II.

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  • First World War Centenary

    First World War Centenary

    June 27, 2014

    The Peace Palace Library will commemorate the First World War Centenary with a series of blogs and items on the website. The Library’s collection on the Great War is focused on aspects of international law: the laws of war, the Paris Peace Conference, the peace treaties of 1919-1920, the war reparations and the politics of its memory. For that purpose, an extensive Research Guide on the topic has been prepared as a starting point for research in the Library. On display right now in our Reading Room showcase the most recent publications on the topic.

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  • Vredespaleis WO I 1914 Verstoorde Vredes-Illusie (01)

    Postcard Peace Palace 1914 ‘Verstoorde Vredes-Illusie’

    March 14, 2014

    Postcard from the days of the First World War. ‘Verstoorde Vredes-Illusie’. On the back: ‘Verstoorde Vredes-Illusie. De Vredesengel door den Oorlogsdemon uit het Vredespaleis verdreven’. Weenenk & Snel, Den Haag. 14 67695. Dated 1914. [Translated from Dutch: ‘Disturbed Peace-Illusion’. On the back: Disturbed Peace-Illusion. The Angel of Peace expelled from the Peace Palace by the War […]

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  • Postcard Peace Palace 1914 'Heeft U het Vredespaleis reeds van binnen gezien?'

    Postcard Peace Palace 1914 ‘Hebt U het Vredespaleis reeds van binnen gezien?’

    March 13, 2014

    Postcard from the days of the First World War. Translated from Dutch: ‘Did you already see the Peace Palace from the inside?’. On the back: Postcard. Lithography Van de Ven – The Hague. Dated 1914. The Peace Palace and the First World War For Andrew Carnegie, the opening of the Peace Palace, on 28 August 1913, […]

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  • Article 247 of the Treaty of Versailles and the “Mystic Lamb”

    Article 247 of the Treaty of Versailles and the “Mystic Lamb”

    February 27, 2014

    The ‘biography’ of the Ghent Altarpiece, also called the Adoration of the Mystic Lamb, reads like a thriller. From the beginning this fascinating work was the object of passionate desire to either possess or destroy it. During the centuries of its existence, the altarpiece witnessed religious upheavals in the Southern Netherlands, came close to being destroyed during these outbreaks of iconoclasm and was damaged when moved to save guard it or when stolen. It endured fires, Napoleon’s looting army and two world wars. Parts of it were stolen, burned, recovered and stolen again and again.

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  • Letter from the Editors

    Letter from the Editors

    January 31, 2014

    This year, we, the editors of the Peace Palace Library Newsletter, will have the pleasure to bring to you once more many international law stories revolving around the activities that will take place in – and around the Peace Palace. In addition to these events, we will continue our popular news items such as the interviews with library users and other important people in international law, book donations, etc.

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  • Andrew Carnegie’s New Year Greeting 1914

    Andrew Carnegie’s New Year Greeting 1914

    January 1, 2014

    Andrew Carnegie’s New Year Greeting was published in The Independant magazine on January 5, 1914. At that time, he was still optimistic on the possibility of a permanent end to war. He had always believed in the power of international law to stave off conflict, and he trusted that future wars would be averted by international arbitration. However, only six months later, World War I began.

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