Peace Palace Library
The international law library

Search our resources

Research guide Law of the Sea

The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (Montego Bay, 10 December 1982), UNCLOS, is the most comprehensive treaty in public international law and covers a range of Law of the Sea topics, such as delimitation of maritime boundaries, islands, maritime zones, fisheries, marine environment protection, deep seabed mining, marine scientific research, criminal acts at sea and ocean governance. ITLOS and ICJ and PCA have jurisdiction to settle international disputes on law of the sea.

Check our Research Guide on Law of the Sea
Read more

Library blog The Autonomous Democracy of the EU

On the eve of the Conference about the Future of Europe the EU Court of Justice (CoJ) has made a significant contribution to the forthcoming debate by clarifying the concept of ‘European democracy’. In a similar way as the CoJ established in 1963/4 in the cases of Van Gend en Loos and Costa v ENEL that the Communities formed an ‘autonomous legal order’, the Court explicated in 2019 that the European Union has an ‘autonomous democracy’. This finding is of great importance for the other EU institutions in their endeavour ‘to give new impetus to European democracy’.

Read blog
Read more

News and events Library closed!

The Peace Palace Library will be closed for the general public from Monday 16 March 2020 onwards (presumably until 1 April 2020) in conformity with government instructions, due to the corona pandemic. Those of you who need to return borrowed books the next couple of weeks, don’t have to do that. Any resulting fines will […]

Read more
Read more

World War I

World War I, or the Great War, was a global war, centred in Europe, that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. It involved all of the world’s great powers, which were assembled in two opposing alliances, the Allies the Central Powers. Ultimately, more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, were mobilised in one of the largest wars in history. The outcome of the war subsequently paved the way for various political changes, such as revolutions in many of the nations involved.

Read more
Read more

South China Sea Territorial Disputes

Territorial disputes in the South China Sea involve both island and maritime claims among several sovereign states within the region, namely Brunei, the People’s Republic of China, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. A significant aspect of the territorial dispute in the South China Sea concerns China’s construction of (artificial) islands. The disputes in the South China focus on the question whether the (land reclamations on the) reefs in the South China Sea are islands or rocks or Low Tide Elevations.

Read more
Read more

Peace Palace Library showcase

  • 529 G 18

  • Thirlway, H., The Sources of International Law, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2019.

  • 529 C 17

  • 536 C 23

  • 530 F 23

  • Kristensen, K.S. and J. Rahbek-Clemmensen, Greenland and the International Politics of a Changing Arctic: Postcolonial Paradiplomacy between High and Low Politics, Abingdon, Oxon; New York, NY, Routledge, 2018.

You can find the showcase in our Reading Room.