Peace Palace Library
The international law library

Search our resources

Research guide Hugo Grotius (1583-1645)

Hugo Grotius (1583-1645) - Research Guide International Law

The Peace Palace Library holds one of the greatest collections in the world of the works of Hugo Grotius (1583-1645), founder of a systematic modern doctrine of international law and universally called the “Father of International Law”. His works also include theological, poetical, historical and philosophical themes. His involvement in the dispute between the Dutch Republic and England over the freedom of the seas led to his views published in “Mare liberum” (1609), still studied by modern researchers of the law of the sea.

Check our Research Guide on Hugo Grotius (1583-1645)
Read more

Library blog The Capture of the Santa Catarina (1603)

By 1602, the newly formed Dutch East India Company (VOC) was threatening Portugal’s monopoly over the Asian spice trade. In response, the Portuguese government designed an extensive campaign to drive out the Dutch from the East Indies. Outraged by the atrocities the Portuguese inflicted on the Dutch and their allies, Admiral Van Heemskerck – sailing in the Strait of Singapore – prepared to retaliate against the Portuguese. After spending months of looking for a Portuguese ship to capture, they at last found one on that morning of February 25, 1603. And not just any ship, but the treasure ship Santa Catarina. The ship and its cargo ended up as booty of war and were taken back to Europe. The incident of the Santa Catarina was most certainly not uncontroversial from a legal point of view …

Read blog
Read more

News and events Carnegie PeaceBuilding Conversations, 24-26 September 2018

A 3 day programme presented by Carnegie institutions Worldwide and other partners at The Peace Palace, The Hague, the Netherlands.
Carnegie PeaceBuilding Conversations 2018

Read more
Read more

Bertha von Suttner (1843-1914)

Bertha Sophia Felicita von Suttner was a 19th century author and peace activist from Austria. Her most famous work, the anti-war novel titled ‘Die Waffen Nieder’ (Lay Down Your Arms), became an international bestseller and was published in all the major world languages of the time. Upon the success of her novel, Bertha von Suttner quickly rose to prominence within the international peace movement that was gaining ground in Europe and in the United States of America. She founded the Austrian Peace Society, contributed to the establishment of many other pacifist organizations throughout Europe and founded a peace journal, Die Waffen Nieder, which was later succeeded by the journal Die Friedens-Warte.

Read more
Read more

World War I

World War I, or the Great War, was a global war, centred in Europe, that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. It involved all of the world’s great powers, which were assembled in two opposing alliances, the Allies the Central Powers. Ultimately, more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, were mobilised in one of the largest wars in history. The outcome of the war subsequently paved the way for various political changes, such as revolutions in many of the nations involved. We have created a Library special on World War I in order to provide you easy access to our collection.

Read more
Read more

Peace Palace Library showcase

  • 534 C 2

  • 526 B 31

  • 529 G 18

  • 529 C 17

  • 529 G 16

  • Durieux, B., J.-B. Jeangène Vilmer et F. Ramel (dir.), Dictionnaire de la Guerre et de la Paix, Paris, Presses Universitaires de France, 2017.

You can find the showcase in our Reading Room.